Chen Jing

Shanghai Correspondent, Lianhe Zaobao

Chen Jing joined Lianhe Zaobao’s China Desk recently and will be posted to Shanghai this year. She has been working at Zaobao for more than eight years, covering financial news and societal stories in Singapore.

Residents burn paper offerings during the annual Qingming Festival in Wuhan, April 4, 2020. (Noel Celis/AFP)

Families in Wuhan want accountability from those who covered up outbreak

With the lockdown on Wuhan about to be lifted on 8 April and the annual Qingming Festival just over, families in Wuhan are coming to terms with their losses. They want accountability from those who covered up the initial outbreak, even as they deal with the psychological impact of the coronavirus and lockdown.
Staff members move medical supplies to be sent to Italy, at a logistics center of the international airport in Hangzhou, March 10, 2020. (China Daily via REUTERS)

Is China’s pandemic diplomacy working?

As the Covid-19 coronavirus starts to ease domestically, China is now extending help to other countries that gave it assistance in the initial stages of the outbreak and publicising its efforts domestically and globally. While these efforts are sparking praise from Chinese netizens, it is getting mixed reactions in the global arena. Academics say a quieter and calmer approach may be preferred. Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing looks at how China’s pandemic diplomacy is being received.
An elderly person wearing a protective masks sits in front of shuttered stores near a hutong neighborhood in Beijing, China, on 18 March 2020. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

Falling revenue, absent staff... Tough road ahead for China's SMEs

Micro, small, and medium enterprises assets account for 77% of the total assets of Chinese enterprises, while their annual revenue contributes 68% of the total amount of annual revenue of Chinese enterprises. Chen Jing, Lianhe Zaobao’s Shanghai correspondent reports that as the coronavirus outbreak in China eases off, SMEs in China are doing their level best to get their businesses up and running again. But the way forward looks to be all uphill.
A memorial for Dr Li Wenliang is pictured outside the UCLA campus in Westwood, California, on 15 February 2020. (Mark Ralston/AFP)

Chinese netizens: Is this how the Li Wenliang story should end?

Netizens are devastated that an investigation report into the Li Wenliang incident released yesterday only yielded a chastising of local police officials. They assert that the report was grossly inadequate in addressing their suspicions of a cover-up in the initial stages of the Covid-19 outbreak. They ask: Was this meagre result all Dr Li Wenliang’s death was worth?
A pedestrian wearing a face mask walks on an overpass with an electronic board showing stock information, following an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at Lujiazui financial district in Shanghai, March 2020. (Aly Song/REUTERS)

China’s economy in worst shape in 30 years

The Covid-19 pandemic has brought China’s economy to a low point. Economic forecasts for the quarter and the whole year have been revised downward, and the continued spread of the coronavirus across the world will not help the situation. Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing speaks to the experts on what to expect in the next few months.
Hundreds of residents gathering at a basketball court in Sea Mountain estate in Yingcheng, Xiaogan, protesting over exorbitantly-priced vegetables.

Hubei protests show need for people-centred approach 

First it was Wuhan residents expressing their indignation at food delivered to them in rubbish trucks. Now, residents of neighbouring city Xiaogan show that they will not stay quiet if monopolistic practices see them paying sky-high prices for daily necessities.