Chen Jing

Shanghai Correspondent, Lianhe Zaobao

Chen Jing joined Lianhe Zaobao’s China Desk recently and will be posted to Shanghai this year. She has been working at Zaobao for more than eight years, covering financial news and societal stories in Singapore.

Chinese RMB banknotes are seen behind an illuminated stock graph in this illustration taken on 10 February 2020. (Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo/Reuters)

China's yet-to-be-announced stimulus package: Dispensing the right dose

In the aftermath of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, China trotted out a mega stimulus package that some analysts say did more harm than good. Months into the coronavirus pandemic and China’s support measures have still been measured. How much further will it go in the coming weeks to alleviate the economic strain on enterprises and individuals?
A Trump supporter waves an American flag during a protest at the Country Club Plaza against social distancing measures, April 20, 2020 in Kansas City, Missouri. The US state of Missouri has sued China's leadership over the coronavirus, prompting an angry rebuke from Beijing April 22, 2020 over the "absurd" claim. Missouri is seeking damages over what it described as deliberate deception and insufficient action to stop the pandemic. (Jamie Squire/AFP)

Missouri sues, but should China be held accountable for the global spread of Covid-19?

Missouri has become the first US state to sue China for its handling of the coronavirus outbreak. What is behind its case and will it stand up to scrutiny? Has China been transparent in disclosing information? Edwin Ong and Chen Jing find out.
An employee at a factory in Wuhan, April 6, 2020. (STR/AFP)

US companies in China: No place that can take China's place

Despite a proposed White House executive order to reduce dependence on China for medical supplies, and a promise by US National Economic Council President Larry Kudlow that the US government will pay for US companies to return home, US companies in China are not biting. Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing speaks to some company leaders to find out why.
Staff members wearing face masks are seen at the Leishenshan Hospital, a makeshift hospital for treating patients infected with the Covid-19 coronavirus, in Wuhan, Hubei, China on 11 April 2020. (Aly Song/Reuters)

How to get the world to believe in China's case?

Experts say China is much mistaken if it thinks that serving up nitty-gritty details on the initial stage of the Covid-19 outbreak will help it deal with the groundswell of negative international opinion against the country.
Police officers at a street crossing in Beijing, April 7, 2020. Control measures in Beijing have not been relaxed yet. (Nicolas Asfouri/AFP)

Stability above all else: Beijing's control measures could stay for rest of year

Beijing’s control measures against the coronavirus outbreak look set to be in place for some time, perhaps for the rest of the year. With stricter rules for people moving in and out of China’s capital, residents and visitors will need to adjust to the new normal. Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing finds out how ordinary people are affected.
In this file photo, a consumer is choosing flour at a supermarket in Taiyuan city, Shanxi province, China. Chinese officials have repeatedly reassured the Chinese people that food supplies are sufficient and there is no need to hoard. (CNS)

Will China plunge into a food crisis? Officials say no

As the Covid-19 pandemic slows down in China, the panic-buying frenzy goes on. Chen Jing reports on people bulking up on supplies across China amid fears of a looming food shortage.
Residents burn paper offerings during the annual Qingming Festival in Wuhan, April 4, 2020. (Noel Celis/AFP)

Families in Wuhan want accountability from those who covered up outbreak

With the lockdown on Wuhan about to be lifted on 8 April and the annual Qingming Festival just over, families in Wuhan are coming to terms with their losses. They want accountability from those who covered up the initial outbreak, even as they deal with the psychological impact of the coronavirus and lockdown.
Staff members move medical supplies to be sent to Italy, at a logistics center of the international airport in Hangzhou, March 10, 2020. (China Daily via REUTERS)

Is China’s pandemic diplomacy working?

As the Covid-19 coronavirus starts to ease domestically, China is now extending help to other countries that gave it assistance in the initial stages of the outbreak and publicising its efforts domestically and globally. While these efforts are sparking praise from Chinese netizens, it is getting mixed reactions in the global arena. Academics say a quieter and calmer approach may be preferred. Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing looks at how China’s pandemic diplomacy is being received.
An elderly person wearing a protective masks sits in front of shuttered stores near a hutong neighborhood in Beijing, China, on 18 March 2020. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

Falling revenue, absent staff... Tough road ahead for China's SMEs

Micro, small, and medium enterprises assets account for 77% of the total assets of Chinese enterprises, while their annual revenue contributes 68% of the total amount of annual revenue of Chinese enterprises. Chen Jing, Lianhe Zaobao’s Shanghai correspondent reports that as the coronavirus outbreak in China eases off, SMEs in China are doing their level best to get their businesses up and running again. But the way forward looks to be all uphill.