Culture

Hong Kongers should be effectively bilingual, but the majority of university students are failing English, consistently getting the ‘D' and ‘E’ grades. What has become of university education in Hong Kong? (iStock)

Lost in translation: What has become of university education in Hong Kong?

When cultural historian Cheng Pei-kai is tasked to use the English language to teach Chinese literature to Hong Kong students, he questions if it is all a ploy to help students improve their standard of English. Such a shame it is then, how gems of China’s precious literary and cultural heritage are withered away in every nuance lost in translation.
Giuseppe Castiglione, Emperor Qianlong Inspecting Troops (《乾隆皇帝大阅图》), The Palace Museum. (Internet)

Suzhou’s way to the Emperor’s heart

Refined and steeped in natural flavours, it’s no wonder that Emperor Qianlong had a soft spot for Suzhou cuisine. Cheng Pei-kai shares the menu.
Although one might not have the experience of seeing a twenty feet tall black ghost that flies, one could have in mind all the concepts that could construct such an image. (iStock)

The Chinese ghost stories we tell ourselves

The word "ghost" (gui) is commonly found in the Chinese lexicon. Professor Poo Mu-chou draws links between history, culture and one’s personal experience to interpret the way humans conjure ghosts up in their own image and likeness in a bid to understand the inexplicable.
The Golden Rooster Awards and Golden Horse Awards went head-to-head this year, including the poster designs.

Did the Rooster or the Horse win?

The two most important award ceremonies of the Chinese film industry- the Golden Rooster Awards and the Golden Horse Awards- were held on the same day this past weekend, in Xiamen and Taipei respectively. Yang Danxu gives her take on each show and how little signs and symbols in each mirror the one-upmanship in cross-strait relations.
A statue of Confucius at the Imperial Academy in Beijing. (iStock)

China’s Confucianist path to soft power

Pang Ruizhi argues that apart from making reforms to its political and government systems, China needs to find strength in its good cultures and traditions. He feels that a revival and remake of Confucianism — a key tenet of Chinese philosophy and thoughts — will be a key booster shot to building a new Chinese culture and strengthen China’s soft power on the international stage.
Toutangmian with stewed meat topping. (Internet)

Art and history in a bowl of Suzhou noodles

Cultural historian Cheng Pei-kai knows his bowl of Suzhou noodles. How is the toutangmian or head soup noodles connected to landscape poetry, Neo-Confucianism and Song dynasty music? And is it going to be the end of the world, if McDonald’s were to sell Suzhou noodles? Prof Cheng shares his thoughts.
The rabbit head is the epitome of “compound flavours” — the Sichuan people consume on average 300 million rabbit heads a year. (Internet)

Off with the rabbit’s head!

How would you feel if rows of rabbit teeth and sunken eyes stared at you on a plate? Food writer Tzu-i devours one like a pro in Sichuan.
Chiang Ching (left) and Brigitte Lin atop Wuyi Mountain. (Photo: Brigitte Lin)

Women of stories: Chiang Ching and Brigitte Lin

As the saying goes, “It’s not where you go, but who you go with.” Chiang Ching and I toured many places of interest, witnessing the full glory of the mountains and waters on our adventure to mainland China. We did many things we’ve never dreamt of doing and it was a really enriching trip. But, the most important thing was the company I had with me.
The amount of effort that went into every bowl of crab butter was so unimaginable that, the idea of sampling it wouldn’t even cross a commoner’s mind. (Internet)

Crab Butter Rice

Crab Butter Rice is unlike any other crab dishes: it is a seasonal delicacy that exclusively combines the autumn crab's paste and roe without using any of its meat. Cultural historian Cheng Pei-kai shares his experience eating it, and its peculiar and debatable origins from Suzhou brothels.