Economy

People walk past the headquarters of the Chinese ride-hailing service Didi in Beijing, China, 3 December 2021. (Thomas Peter/File Photo/Reuters)

Does end of Didi probe signal new beginnings for China’s internet economy?

With the economic and political blowback from its regulatory crackdowns in the past two years, coupled with economic pressures from the pandemic, the Chinese authorities may be ready to ease up on high-pressure regulations of the internet sector.
A man walks past an electronic display showing the Hang Seng Index in the Central district of Hong Kong on 27 May 2022. (Bertha Wang/AFP)

Geopolitics affecting HK's financial market. Can Singapore benefit?

Amid US-China tensions, mainland China companies blacklisted by the US are expected to expand their presence in Hong Kong. While it may seem that the special autonomous region will reap the benefits, NUS academic Ben Charoenwong says investors are in fact wary of the costs involved and may look to other financial hubs like Singapore. But is Singapore ready to fill that role?
A woman holds Chinese RMB banknotes in this illustration taken on 30 May 2022. (Dado Ruvic/Illustration/Reuters)

Easing pandemic controls could curb RMB’s tumble against the dollar

The RMB's recent dramatic weakening did not come as a surprise to many. As stringent Covid-19 measures gradually ease, along with possible relaxations of policies in the real estate sector, could the worst be over for China's economy?
A demonstrator throws back a tear gas canister fired by police to disperse students taking part in an anti-government protest demanding the resignation of Sri Lanka's President Gotabaya Rajapaksa over the country's crippling economic crisis, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on 29 May 2022. (Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP)

Sri Lanka crisis: China's global image at stake

ISAS academic Chulanee Attanayake explains the bind China is in with regards to the Sri Lanka economic and political crisis. On the one hand, China does not want to set a precedent for bailing out cash-strapped partners, but it also needs to maintain its carefully built image as an unwavering friend to small developing nations.
A screengrab from a video showing the national teleconference on the economy chaired by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, 25 May 2022. (Internet)

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang’s meeting of 100,000 attendees conveys sense of urgency on the economy

On 25 May, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang chaired a teleconference on China’s economy with 100,000 attendees. The sheer scale of the meeting and rhetoric used indicates a sense of urgency. The government is keen to convey that it is well aware that the Chinese economy is faring worse than in 2020 when the pandemic first hit and that it has all hands on deck.
Pedestrians carry shopping bags on Geary street in San Francisco, California, US, on 18 May 2022. (David Paul Morris/Bloomberg)

Can high inflation in the US bring an end to the China-US trade war?

With inflation reaching historic highs, the Biden administration is facing a challenging road ahead of the midterm elections in November. The lifting of some tariffs on China could ease inflation in the US and appease voters, bringing an end to the China-US trade war. However, views in the White House are mixed. Zaobao correspondent Edwin Ong speaks with academics to find out more.
Workers assemble an electric car at the VinFast electric automobile plant in Haiphong, Vietnam, on 7 April 2022. (Nhac Nguyen/AFP)

Should Beijing worry about the exodus of manufacturing from China to Vietnam?

It appears that Beijing is losing some of its factory orders with MNCs and investors putting their bets on Vietnam. But maybe it is a win-win situation: as China moves to transition its economy to advanced manufacturing, countries like Vietnam with a young and relatively cheap labour force could fill the gap.
An empty road is seen at Shanghai Central Business District during a lockdown, amid the Covid-19 pandemic, in Shanghai, China, 16 April 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Why China's economists and entrepreneurs are keeping mum about the economy

Even as the Chinese authorities continue to battle the spread of Covid-19, one thing is bugging people: why does it seem like nobody cares about the economy? China’s latest economic figures do not look good, and the protracted lockdown in Shanghai and semi-lockdowns in Beijing are not helping people’s livelihoods. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan examines the cost of zero-Covid.
People ride escalators at a business district in Beijing, China, on 16 May 2022. (Wang Zhao/AFP)

China's unified national market has its drawbacks and challenges

The Chinese government has recently announced plans to establish a unified national market that is highly efficient, standardised, open and competitive. It would break down walls, raise the standards of the business environment within China and act as a buffer against external pressures. While the intention is good, NUS academic Lu Xi points to possible drawbacks and challenges.