Economy

The US and China have been competing on different fronts. (Jason Lee/REUTERS)

China and the US, who innovates better?

Who is the better innovator between China and the US? Prof Chen Kang observes that both sides are lacking in confidence in their innovative capabilities, and the grass seems greener on the other side. What are their strengths and weaknesses, and how can China and the West overcome their own insecurities to be more adaptable and responsive?
China is finding out how it fits in on the world stage. (SPH)

China will shake the world: World stage (Part II)

In this two-part article, we explore China’s progress from a poor, underdeveloped country to an economic superpower, with a major impact on world affairs. How has this been possible? What does it mean for the rest of the world?
And as Napoleon Bonaparte predicted earlier: “China is a sleeping giant. When it awakens, the whole world will shake”. (iStock)

China will shake the world: Success recipe (Part I)

In this two-part article, we explore China’s progress from a poor, underdeveloped country to an economic superpower, with a major impact on world affairs. How has this been possible? What does it mean for the rest of the world?
The Kra Isthmus in Thailand. For a long time, the idea of a canal has been proposed, but never realised. (iStock)

Thailand’s Kra canal project: Game changers and China’s involvement

The Kra canal project has been proposed and put on hold many times over the past three centuries. The latest effort comes in conjunction with China's Belt and Road Initiative, and has drawn both support and scepticism from within and outside Thailand. ISEAS - Yusof Ishak Institute senior fellow Ian Storey examines three potential game changers for the project.
DPM’s meeting with PRC Vice-Premier Han Zheng in May 2019, in Beijing, China. (MCI)

Singapore and China: Scaling new peaks together

Singapore Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Finance Heng Swee Keat and China Vice Premier Han Zheng will co-chair the 15th Joint Council for Bilateral Cooperation meeting on 15 October in Chongqing. DPM Heng wrote this article for ThinkChina on the eve of his departure for China, sharing Singapore's goals and hopes for our bilateral relationship and collaboration with China.
Only when the ownership and operations are diversified can the BRI become a true economic initiative and a platform for global cooperation, and thus extricate itself from endless international and geopolitical disruptions. (iStock)

Why the BRI needs global private investors

There are numerous obstacles to overcome but China needs to get global private investors to come onboard its massive BRI projects. Professor Gu Qingyang opines on China's possible approach and strategy in this third part of his series on the BRI.
After years of broad-based growth, China’s economy had become a force to be reckoned with. For about 16 to 20 years, China had devoted itself fully to economic development and managed to overcome some major hurdles. (iStock)

ASEAN: The ultimate winner of a China-US rivalry (Part I)

China’s dominance on the global stage continues to grow. It could just become another “sun” in a solar system that has revolved around the US in the post-war era. But can two “suns” coexist? And what will happen to the other planets around them? This two-part essay is adapted from Prof Tan Kong Yam’s recent speeches in China and the US.
A few global trends could emerge out of this, one of them being the coexistence of two suns in the solar system. (Graphic: Jace Yip)

ASEAN: The ultimate winner of a China-US rivalry (Part II)

China’s dominance on the global stage continues to grow. It could just become another “sun” in a solar system that has revolved around the US in the post-war era. But can two “suns” coexist? And what will happen to the other planets around them? This two-part essay is adapted from Prof Tan Kong Yam’s recent speeches in China and the US.
Countries will have to work together on the BRI to handle challenges. (SPH)

Why the BRI needs the USA

In the second part of his series on the BRI, Professor Gu Qingyang explains why the US should consider working with China on the BRI.