Erik Baark

Professor Emeritus, Division of Social Science, Hong Kong University of Science & Technology

Erik Baark is Professor Emeritus at the Division of Social Science at the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology. He received a PhD at the University of Lund (1986) and a DPhil at the University of Copenhagen (1998). His research on China includes analysis of information systems and IT development and high technology entrepreneurship during recent policy reforms. He has also published extensively on innovation in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta. His numerous publications include Lightning Wires: Telegraphs and China's Technological Modernization 1860-1890 (Greenwood Press, 1997) and articles in leading international area studies journals such as The China Quarterly and innovation research journals such as Research Policy and the International Journal of Technology Management. 

 

Visitors look at a display of a semiconductor device at Semicon China, a trade fair for semiconductor technology, in Shanghai, China, 17 March 2021. (Aly Song/Reuters)

China's going full speed ahead on technology innovation. Will it work?

Amid intense technological competition with the US, China is more determined than ever to be self-reliant in core frontier technologies. It has rolled out various plans but several obstacles such as financial resources stand in the way. Is it a case of more haste, less speed?
A robotic dog powered by Huawei Cloud is seen at a booth during Huawei Connect in Shanghai, China, 23 September 2020. (Aly Song/Reuters)

China's whole-of-nation push for technological innovation

Innovation features prominently in the proposals for China's 14th Five-Year Plan. Apart from building up long-term resources such as education and basic scientific research, much government weight will be thrown behind building self-reliance in core technologies, including in the semiconductor industry, says Erik Baark and Qian Jiwei.