Han Yong Hong

Han Yong Hong

Associate Editor, Zaobao; Editor, Zaobao.com

Yong Hong is an associate editor of Zaobao and the editor of Zaobao.com. She joined Lianhe Zaobao as a journalist in 2000, covering theatre, music and visual arts. In 2005, she was assigned to the Beijing bureau as a correspondent, and became the chief correspondent in 2009. She received the Business China Young Achiever Award in 2011, making her the second recipient of this award, and the first journalist to receive this recognition.

People gather to offer flowers at Zojoji Temple, where the funeral of late former Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe, who was shot while campaigning for a parliamentary election, will be held, in Tokyo, Japan, 12 July 2022. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)

Are Chinese fears of a rise in Japanese militarism post-Abe valid?

Following former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s death, the pro-constitutional amendment camp retained a majority during the upper house election, marking a step forward for the revision of Japan’s post-war constitution. Nevertheless, Japan will still need to approach the matter with caution to avoid damaging the already delicate relations with the US and China. Zaobao associate editor Han Yong Hong shares more on the issue.
Hong Kong Chief Executive John Lee attends question and answer session at Legislative Council, in Hong Kong, China, 6 July 2022. (Lam Yik/Reuters)

The Hong Kong story according to John Lee amid criticisms from the West

At his first Legislative Council meeting on 6 July, Hong Kong Chief Executive John Lee laid out his work plan and likened Hong Kong to a “gentleman” that has to respond robustly to attacks from “nasty people” bent on smearing the city. Zaobao’s associate editor Han Yong Hong examines how he plans to tell the Hong Kong story well.
US President Joe Biden during a news conference following the final day of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) summit at the IFEMA congress center in Madrid, Spain, on 30 June 2022. (Valeria Mongelli/Bloomberg)

What a ‘resurrected’ NATO means for China and the world

The recent NATO summit in Madrid seems to indicate that NATO is making a comeback in full force. For China, painted as presenting “systemic challenges” to NATO, this should sound a warning that when the time is ripe for the US to contain China, key countries in the Asia-Pacific and the EU will not be on its side.
Yang Jiechi (first from right) and Jake Sullivan (first from left) at their meeting in Luxembourg, 13 June 2022. (Xinhua)

Xi-Biden meeting unlikely as China-US relations stay locked in stalemate

While virtual meetings between Xi Jinping and Joe Biden have usually followed in-person meetings between the countries’ top diplomats, there is no sign of a virtual summit taking place any time soon after China's Yang Jiechi and US national security adviser Jake Sullivan met in Luxembourg. For the US, internal disagreement over trade tariff issues could be causing the pause. And in the case of China, it has already let go of any false hope for better ties.
This aerial photo taken on 30 May 2022 shows the local fishing village of Neian in Xiyu Township on the Penghu islands. In the sleepy fishing towns on the Penghu islands, many locals are sanguine despite the frequent - and noisy - reminders of the military threat by neighbouring China. (Sam Yeh/AFP)

China-US war of words: Is Taiwan Strait international waters?

China has recently begun a campaign to say that the Taiwan Strait cannot be considered “international waters” based on the UNCLOS. Zaobao’s associate editor Han Yong Hong sees this as Beijing's way to assert its jurisdiction over the Taiwan Strait and that it is ready to boost and expand its scope of military actions over the area.
China’s General Wei Fenghe and his delegates arrive at Dutch Pavilion at Shangri-La Hotel, Singapore, for a meeting with his counterparts from the US. (SPH Media)

Shangri-La Dialogue 2022: A tougher diplomatic battle for China?

Given the tough stand of Chinese Defence Minister Wei Fenghe at the previous Shangri-La Dialogue in 2019, and the current tense relations between China and the US, this week’s Shangri-La Dialogue is set to offer some sparks. Zaobao’s associate editor Han Yong Hong examines some points of contention and what previous rhetoric suggests.
People walk in the Lujiazui financial district in Shanghai, China, 1 June 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

China's crackdown on stats fraud in local governments. Why now?

The recent removal of high-ranking officials has cast the spotlight on the longstanding issue of local governments fabricating statistics. As officials compete for promotion, they manipulate economic data to show stellar political achievements, but this leads to bad policies, blind optimism and unrealistically high goals. Zaobao's associate editor Han Yong Hong looks into the matter.
A screengrab from a video showing the national teleconference on the economy chaired by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, 25 May 2022. (Internet)

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang’s meeting of 100,000 attendees conveys sense of urgency on the economy

On 25 May, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang chaired a teleconference on China’s economy with 100,000 attendees. The sheer scale of the meeting and rhetoric used indicates a sense of urgency. The government is keen to convey that it is well aware that the Chinese economy is faring worse than in 2020 when the pandemic first hit and that it has all hands on deck.
Ferdinand Marcos Jr (left) with Mao Zedong (centre) and Imelda Marcos, on a visit to China in September 1957. (Twitter)

Ferdinand ‘Bongbong’ Marcos Jr, the president-elect who kissed Mao Zedong

With Ferdinand Marcos Jr achieving a landslide win in the Philippine presidential election, how will the Philippines’ China policy change? In particular, given the legacy of the Marcos family’s good relations with China as well as former President Duterte’s pro-China stance, how will the incoming president handle relations with the US?