Lance Gore

Senior research fellow, East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore

Dr. Lance Gore previously taught at several universities in the United States and Australia, and is currently a senior research fellow at the East Asian Institute of National University of Singapore. His recent books include The Chinese Communist Party and China’s Capitalist Revolution: The Political Impact of Market and Chinese Politics Illustrated: The Social, Cultural and Historical Context. His current research is on the new technological revolution. He is working on two books, one examining the post-capitalist trends in the world and the policy and political implications for China, and the other on entrepreneurship in the public sector.

A new Cold War between the US and China could ensue. (iStock)

Escaping the new Cold War: Fostering understanding between China and the West

Lance Gore, senior research fellow of the East Asian Institute, warns that a new cold war awaits China and the US if they continue to talk over each other. How can the two giants see each other in a better light? How can China improve its rule of law and governance practices?
The Chinese system has governance capacity to tackle the emerging “troubled times”. This picture shows children waiting to bid farewell to China's President Xi Jinping and his wife Peng Liyuan at the international airport in Macau on 20 December, 2019.  (Photo by Eduardo Leal/AFP)

China's governance model: The way forward for today's world?

Lance Gore from the East Asian Institute says that the shape and form of widespread protests around the world show how states are fast losing their authority to govern. Systems in liberal democracies give protesters the space to air their views, but not necessarily the solutions they are looking for. In this regard, China’s brand of authoritarianism coupled with good governance may surprisingly be the tack to take.
The Chinese national flag (right) flies alongside the Hong Kong flag. (Anthony Wallace/AFP)

Wherein lies the future of Hong Kong?

Lance Gore opines that what is at stake in Hong Kong is really the Hong Kongers’ immediate interests, and the future of the Pearl of the Orient.  He spoke to protesters on the ground and found out that not only do they not identify in the least with mainland China, they overflow with resistance; not only do they feel no shame about Hong Kong’s colonial past, they are actually very proud of it. Wherein lies its future then?
Will the world be able to understand China better? (iStock)

How not to get lambasted on the world stage: Some advice for China

China has made efforts to be accepted on the international stage. These efforts are not always well-received.