Politics

Tension is rising between China and Sweden. (iStock)

The Swedish Ambassador’s trial: A cautionary tale on taking a personal stance towards China

In unfolding developments in the detained Hong Kong bookseller Gui Minhai case, Anna Lindstedt, former Swedish ambassador to China, is facing trial for allegedly arranging a meeting between Gui’s daughter and businessmen with interests in the matter. Lianhe Zaobao's Beijing correspondent Yew Lun Tian thinks that this will serve as a cautionary tale to the Swedish to be extra careful when dealing with foreigners, especially those from China. 
Celebrations following the landslide victory of the pro-democracy camp during the recent district council election in Hong Kong. (Laurel Chor/Reuters)

Hong Kong gears up for more election battles

After heavy defeats suffered by the pro-establishment camp in the recent district council election in Hong Kong, what lies ahead for the upcoming Legislative Council elections and elections for the Election Committee and the Chief Executive? Tai Hing Shing gathers relevant views and lays the cards on the table.
Huawei's image is badly damaged after the wrongful detention of its ex-employee, Li Hongyuan. (REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke)

Public anger over Huawei subsiding

Public anger over the wrongful 251-days detention of Huawei ex-employee Li Hongyuan may be subsiding, but Huawei’s damaged reputation may not be easily salvaged in the short term. Lianhe Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan observes that public opinion is a double-edged sword. Companies have to be extremely sensitive when it comes to managing their public relations.
TikTok has found itself mired in court cases recently. (Dado Ruvic/Reuters)

TikTok: Another victim of the China-US tech war

Veteran China affairs journalist Han Yong Hong examines recent flak TikTok has received in the US, suggesting that it reflects different approaches the US and China have towards freedom of speech and its responsibilities. Interestingly, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg is in the front rank of those criticising TikTok in the name of upholding free speech. Who has the users' interest in mind and how can Tik Tok fend off the heat?
The Hong Kong Legislative Council Building, standing in the shadow of business towers in the CBD. (iStock)

Hong Kong: The perils of state corporatism

Influential Hong Kong political commentator Simon Shen argues that Beijing is seeking to control the economic and political freedoms of the Hong Kong people by controlling the business community. He cautions against state corporatism of the sort employed in fascist states of the past and discusses how such state control can creep into our everyday lives.
Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou leaves her home to appear in British Columbia supreme court for a hearing, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, September 30, 2019. An ankle bracelet is also seen as she leaves for her court hearing. (REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson)

Meng Wanzhou: Your warmth lights my path

On the first anniversary of her arrest in Vancouver, Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou pens an open letter about her days under house arrest. In an emotive account, she says the strength she draws from warm words and gestures will light her way forward. This is the English translation of her full letter in Chinese. The original Chinese version of her letter is included at the end.
People chant slogans and hold the words "release (the protesters)" near a police-cordoned area to show support for a small group of protesters barricaded for over a week inside the Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus in Hung Hom district in Hong Kong on November 25, 2019. (Ye Aung Thu/AFP)

Social protests in the era of affluence

Social movements of today are no longer campaigns by the downtrodden poor but avenues for the well-educated middle class to air their anti-establishment discontent. Aided by social media, these groups appropriate concepts without understanding their true meanings, and look set to stay due to structural imbalance in the world caused by globalisation, technological progress and social divide. Zheng Yongnian opines that states badly need institutional reforms if they are to engage the social movements of today.
A protester waves a US and a colonial Hong Kong flag at a rally in Hong Kong. (Leah Millis/REUTERS)

Beijing no longer “Grandpa” to young Hong Kongers

Hong Kongers used to call Beijing “Grandpa”. But the recent protests and the district council elections show that they no longer see mainland China as an authority figure. Tai Hing Shing analyses how Beijing lost its standing in Hong Kong.
A demonstrator wears an anonymous mask, also known as a Guy Fawkes mask, and an American flag during the "Thanksgiving Day Assembly for Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act" at Edinburgh Place in the Central district of Hong Kong, China, on Thursday, Nov. 28, 2019. (Justin Chin/Bloomberg)

Short-term wins and long-term losses for Hong Kong

What made Hong Kongers stand with the rioters during the recent district council elections? Does this landslide victory for the pro-democracy camp really count as a win for Hong Kong? How will Beijing react? Veteran China affairs journalist and associate editor of Zaobao Han Yong Hong gives her opinion.