Society

The mother of Li Xincao went online for help to seek justice for her daughter's mysterious death. (Internet)

Who killed the girl? Chinese keyboard warriors seek justice online

The death of a teenager and the reduced sentence of a triad boss may seem unrelated, but these two cases in Kunming have united China's Internet community in a common search for truth and justice. Shanghai correspondent Yang Danxu looks at the lack of trust between the Chinese public and its law enforcement system.
The lack of mutual understanding and unbalanced exchanges between the young people of China and the US is a major potential concern in the future of China-US relations. (AFP)

A one-sided relationship: China-US education exchange

At present, there are about 12,000 American students studying at Chinese universities, while the number of Chinese students studying in the US is 30 times as many. Prof Zhu Zhiqun who teaches in an American University says this will impact China-US relations in the long run.
Do you have what it takes to survive at the workplace in China? (iStock)

Are you hungry: Survival tips for China

Are you hungry enough to do what it takes to succeed? So Cheer shares his encounters in China, how his client rejected a dinner appointment for six times and how he wolfed down a plate of noodles that could be cooked using gutter oil. So, what does it take to succeed at the workplace in China?
For most people, after posting an update of their patriotism, everything goes back to normal immediately. (iStock)

Patriotic on WeChat, narcissist in real life

We live in an increasingly globalized world, and yet nationalism is on the rise. How is the country related to the individual in our times? Many proclaim patriotism on social media, but how does that translate into actions in real life? Deng Xize from Sichuan University gives his take from China.
China's Post-90s are caught in a whirlpool of uncertainties and are dissatisfied with their lives. (iStock)

China’s future through the lens of the Post-90s

All eyes are on China’s youths born in the affluent 1990s, are they satisfied with their lives? Are they confident in their country?
Middle-class wannabes in the same boat: it may look like a luxurious yacht to outsiders, but it’s hardly stable. Financial instability threatens to rock the boat and those in it are using it as a guise to hide their insecurities. (Graphic: Jace Yip)

The emergence of the Chinese “middle-class wannabes” and their race towards a higher social status

China’s “middle-class wannabes” live on the margins of a lower-middle class income, leading seemingly glamorous lives, but what goes on behind the scenes is a life laden with tough challenges and insecurities.
Yangmeizhu Xiejie has been preserved amid major urban redevelopment. Over half of the 1,100 residents have chosen to stay on.

Preserving the hutong: "What’s in it for us?"

Heritage conservation sounds ideal, but not every resident of Beijing’s heritage streets wants their homes to stay.
Our ThinkChina writer So Cheer is no longer lost in translation in China.

Lost in translation - Trans-lost-ation!

Digital transformation expert Kwek So Cheer was confident in his grasp of the Chinese language - until his work brought him to China in 2012.