Society

The lack of mutual understanding and unbalanced exchanges between the young people of China and the US is a major potential concern in the future of China-US relations. (AFP)

A one-sided relationship: China-US education exchange

At present, there are about 12,000 American students studying at Chinese universities, while the number of Chinese students studying in the US is 30 times as many. Prof Zhu Zhiqun who teaches in an American University says this will impact China-US relations in the long run.
Do you have what it takes to survive at the workplace in China? (iStock)

Are you hungry: Survival tips for China

Are you hungry enough to do what it takes to succeed? So Cheer shares his encounters in China, how his client rejected a dinner appointment for six times and how he wolfed down a plate of noodles that could be cooked using gutter oil. So, what does it take to succeed at the workplace in China?
For most people, after posting an update of their patriotism, everything goes back to normal immediately. (iStock)

Patriotic on WeChat, narcissist in real life

We live in an increasingly globalized world, and yet nationalism is on the rise. How is the country related to the individual in our times? Many proclaim patriotism on social media, but how does that translate into actions in real life? Deng Xize from Sichuan University gives his take from China.
Tang Jinglin, his wife, and his daughter, now city-dwellers. (Photo: Tang Jinglin)

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part I): Tang Jinglin

(Video and text) The story of a teacher farmer who worked hard his whole life to finally live in the city. Yet, a part of him will always remain with the fields. “A farmer can never be separated from his land at any time. Peace of mind comes only with land ownership,” he says. 
In 1974, Qiu Yaotian (second from left) was given a recommendation to study Chinese at the Shuangyashan Normal School, the most important turning point in his life. (Photo: Qiu Yaotian)

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part II): Qiu Yaotian

(Video and text) At 20, Qiu Yaotian became a zhiqing and was part of the border support exodus. He endured harsh living conditions, his university dream was shattered. Yet, he pulled through and is enjoying his twilight years, busy with things he had no chance to do in his younger days. What then, is his last concern?
Hu Sen wanted to study and be a researcher or university professor, and had no intention of starting a business. In the end, he left Yale and became an entrepreneur. (Photo: Lim Zhan Ting)

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part IV): Hu Sen

(Video and text) With the advent of the Internet age, new opportunities opened up in the tech field for those daring enough to seize them. This is the story of one who made that decision.
Zhang Yuting, aged 9, with her mother.

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part V): Zhang Yuting

(Video and text) As China moves forward, some young people want a simple life close to nature, even as they are plugged into the world of online clicks and likes.
Huang Juan (third from the right) in a group photo with her colleagues from the China Construction Bank. (Photo: Huang Juan)

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part III): Huang Juan

(Video and text) This is the story of a woman's leap of faith in leaving 24 years of civil service behind to follow her heart.
China's Post-90s are caught in a whirlpool of uncertainties and are dissatisfied with their lives. (iStock)

China’s future through the lens of the Post-90s

All eyes are on China’s youths born in the affluent 1990s, are they satisfied with their lives? Are they confident in their country?