Society

A protestor holds a placard as he takes part in a protest against the ban on TikTok in Kathmandu, Nepal, on 18 November 2023. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters)

Nepal’s TikTok ban: Navigating the domestic and geopolitical tightrope

Nepal’s recent ban on TikTok was a result of both societal and political concerns, says Indian academic Rishi Gupta. In the aftermath, will there be ripple effects on Nepal's relations with China?
People use umbrellas to protect themselves from the rain in Hong Kong, China, on 16 June 2023. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP)

Hong Kong issue only an insignificant part of US diplomacy

Lianhe Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing notes that even as evidence shows that the US does not value Hong Kong as much as pro-democracy Hong Kongers think it does, overly idealistic Hong Kongers still buy into the narrative that the US will step in on Hong Kong’s behalf in dealing with Beijing. It is time for this group to wake up.
(From left) Bi Huijun, Wei Qingtao and Liu Zhengqi in their confession videos. (Internet)

China's all-out effort to wipe out scam syndicate families in northern Myanmar

It seems that scam operators, not least the “four big families” of northern Myanmar or Kokang, are being put on notice in Northern Myanmar. Skirmishes between the Brotherhood Alliance armed forces and the junta are helping to ferret out these organisations. Given that Kokang borders China, the animosity between the Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army and the junta government will test how China strikes a balance between them.
This photo taken on 10 November 2023 shows fighters of the ethnic rebel group Ta'ang National Liberation Army (TNLA) walking down a street market in the town of Namhkam in northern Shan state. A surprise offensive by Myanmar ethnic armed groups has blocked two strategically vital roads to the country's biggest trading partner China, choking cross-border commerce and denying the cash-strapped junta taxes and foreign exchange. (Mai Nyi/AFP)

Why Myanmar’s warring groups are vying to combat cybercrimes

In an unexpected twist, the warring groups in Myanmar’s civil war have a unified goal: combating cybercrime and ingratiating themselves with China.
People exit a metro station in Taipei, Taiwan, 19 August 2023. (Ann Wang/Reuters)

[Big read] Can older workers solve Taiwan's labour shortage problem?

Given Taiwan’s low birth rate and ageing population, the labour shortage has become a severe issue, especially in the hospitality industry. While the government seems to be keen to open up to migrant workers, this might mean larger issues down the road. So why not open up the opportunities for Taiwan’s middle-aged and elderly? Lianhe Zaobao journalist Chuang Hui Liang speaks with academics and industry insiders to find out more.
People attend a job fair in Beijing, China, on 19 August 2023. (Jade Gao/AFP)

Why foreign degrees have lost their lustre for Chinese graduates

More than 1.2 million Chinese studying overseas are expected to return home this year, but the hunt for a job this year could be tougher than in past years for these overseas graduates. In the countries where they studied, Chinese graduates are also finding it hard to secure a job. With global economic growth slowing and unemployment rising, some countries have accelerated the pace of stabilising their job markets this year, including tightening visa rules.
Controversy broke out over a primary school in China that required all students to wear helmets to and fro school. (Weibo)

Safety first: Why this Chinese school is asking all students to wear helmets to school

As schools are held liable when students get injured for whatever reason, some Chinese schools have taken to implementing measures such as making all students wear helmets to school — whether or not they ride scooters or motorcycles — and restricting their movements in between classes. What effect is this having on schools, parents and children? How much is too much?
A collage image of New York's Chinatown by Singaporean photographer and artist John Clang. (Photo: John Clang)

Should overseas Chinese be patriotic to the motherland?

Chinese people migrating overseas is a phenomenon that has occurred throughout the ages, but in history these migrants were treated with disdain and even faced execution. US academic Fei-Ling Wang looks at why one decides to leave their native land and even to become a citizen of a foreign country, and how they navigate between their chosen country and that of their ancestors.
Chinese Nationalist troops crossing the Three Gorges in western Hubei province during the Second Sino-Japanese War. (Wikipedia)

War correspondents: Risking their lives for truth

Commentator Chip Tsao notes how the war correspondents in China decades ago reported the truth about the Sino-Japanese War, and the difference it made in the eventual outcome. Would the truth be similarly reported today?