Society

A girl takes a photograph beneath the flags of Hong Kong and mainland China, in Hong Kong, in this file photo. (CNS)

25 years after the handover: The ‘end for Hong Kong’ or just the beginning?

After the political and societal changes that have taken place in Hong Kong in the 25 years since the handover, what’s left in the aftermath? Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing ponders the nostalgic, the bittersweet and the hard realities of Hong Kong’s present and future.
A playground in a zoo with an admission fee of 10 RMB per child.

A Singaporean in China: Don't take free playgrounds for granted

Former journalist Jessie Tan shares her observations as a mother in China as she looks at the outdoor spaces where Chinese children can play, learn and grow. While the options are plenty, the costs to entertain children cannot be avoided, posing a challenge to lower-income families.
A medical worker in a protective suit collects a swab from a resident at a makeshift PCR testing site amid the Covid-19 outbreak in Beijing, China, 25 May 2022. (Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

PCR testing is big business in China. But who will bear the cost?

PCR testing has become the norm in China and is now a burgeoning industry. However, despite the clear benefits of effective pandemic control, authorities must consider the cost implications before large-scale normalised testing can be implemented across the country. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu looks into the matter.
This file photo taken on 22 March 2022 shows a woman collecting cardboard at a housing estate in Hong Kong. (Peter Parks/AFP)

Why HK civil servants' pay rise proposal is facing public outcry

Amid a bleak economic outlook, a pay increment has been proposed for Hong Kong’s civil servants, sparking criticisms that the Hong Kong government is out of touch with popular sentiment. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing observes that the backlash is not just a public outcry but a way for Beijing to vent its frustration against the civil servants too.
Chinese textbook illustrations have come under fire.

Suggestive Chinese textbook illustrations: An infiltration by the West?

Recently, there has been an uproar in China over illustrations in school textbooks, with comments that the characters drawn are “ugly”, with some depicted in suggestive poses and wearing questionable designs on clothing. Is this merely a question of aesthetics, or does the problem go deeper? Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan looks into the issue.
One of the near-empty streets in Shanghai, lined with PCR test tents.

Reflecting on two months of lockdown in Shanghai

As Shanghai slowly moves towards resuming life and business, Zaobao’s Shanghai correspondent Chen Jing files her last entry in a series of articles documenting the lockdown.
People cross a pedestrian crossing in Hong Kong on 16 May 2022. (Peter Parks/AFP)

Why is the Hong Kong government targeting Telegram?

The Hong Kong government has announced that it is considering blocking Telegram in response to doxxing content on the social media platform. The app has also been accused of playing a key role in facilitating social and democratic movements. But if Hong Kong bans Telegram, will that be the city's first step towards conforming with the mainland’s internet censorship rules?
An aerial shot of the collapsed "self-built" building in Changsha, Hunan province, China, on 29 April 2022. (CNS)

Building collapses in China call for more stringent checks on structural safety

An eight-storey building adjacent to the Changsha Medical University collapsed on 29 April, killing 54 people, mainly students. It turned out that the building was a "self-build" that had been modified by the owners rather than constructed by developers. Authorities are now clamping down on safety inspections of building structures, but is it a case of too little, too late?
Primary school students work with flour during a cooking lesson in school, in Ganzhou, Jiangxi province, China, on 13 May 2022. (Xinhua)

Chinese kids to undergo nine years of culinary training: Parents are worried 

China’s education ministry recently introduced a new curriculum for primary and secondary students with the aim of teaching life skills. From cooking to technology applications, young children will be better equipped to face society. However, parents have voiced their concerns about the added burden on both children and parents.