Tai Hing Shing

Journalist, Lianhe Zaobao

Tai Hing Shing is a Hong Kong- and Macau-based journalist with Lianhe Zaobao. He has been in the media industry for over a decade, focusing on Chinese diplomacy and Southeast Asian politics. He likes to analyse issues pertaining to Hong Kong and Macau from an international politics perspective.

A man waves the Chinese flag to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the city's handover from Britain to China, in Hong Kong on 1 July 2022. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP)

One country, two systems: Can Hong Kong hold on to its characteristics?

Despite Chinese President Xi Jinping’s recent speech reaffirming Hong Kong’s future as well as the “one country, two systems” policy, many are worried that Hong Kong’s unique advantages are weakening fast amid a tightening of political space. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing tells us more.
People wave Chinese and Hong Kong flags as fishing boats with banners and flags to mark the 25th anniversary of the Handover of Hong Kong from Britain to China sail through Hong Kong’s Victoria harbour on 28 June 2022. (Peter Parks/AFP)

‘New Hong Kongers’ entering politics must act in the interests of all Hong Kongers

Hong Kong’s incoming Chief Executive John Lee has nominated the next batch of senior officials, who have been duly appointed by China’s State Council. Many “new Hong Kongers” are gradually making their way into politics through various channels, facilitated by the central government in Beijing, who are not satisfied with the pro-establishment camp in Hong Kong. But can these new Hong Kongers show that they have the interests of all Hong Kongers at heart?
A girl takes a photograph beneath the flags of Hong Kong and mainland China, in Hong Kong, in this file photo. (CNS)

25 years after the handover: The ‘end for Hong Kong’ or just the beginning?

After the political and societal changes that have taken place in Hong Kong in the 25 years since the handover, what’s left in the aftermath? Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing ponders the nostalgic, the bittersweet and the hard realities of Hong Kong’s present and future.
This file photo taken on 22 March 2022 shows a woman collecting cardboard at a housing estate in Hong Kong. (Peter Parks/AFP)

Why HK civil servants' pay rise proposal is facing public outcry

Amid a bleak economic outlook, a pay increment has been proposed for Hong Kong’s civil servants, sparking criticisms that the Hong Kong government is out of touch with popular sentiment. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing observes that the backlash is not just a public outcry but a way for Beijing to vent its frustration against the civil servants too.
People are tested at a temporary testing site for Covid-19 in Hong Kong on 12 February 2022, as authorities scrambled to ramp up testing capacity following a record high of new infections. (Louise Delmotte/AFP)

'Zero-Covid' or living with the virus: Does Hong Kong know what it wants?

Hong Kong is facing its toughest Covid-19 test yet with Covid-19 variants proving tricky and daily cases going into the thousands. Some panicked Hong Kongers have taken flight to the mainland to avoid catching the disease. Others are questioning the “dynamic zero-Covid” policy, asking why Hong Kong can’t “live with the virus” as countries like Singapore are doing.
This photo taken on 6 January 2022 shows a vendor sorting newspapers at a newsstand in Hong Kong. (Peter Parks/AFP)

As HK pro-democracy media exits the scene, mainland media swoops in

The media landscape in Hong Kong is facing great upheaval, following the closures of prominent pro-democracy media such as Apple Daily and Stand News. Hong Kong pro-democracy media refugees have since taken their work overseas but few believe commentaries from afar can fill the gap of public discussion left in Hong Kong. Meanwhile, mainland-friendly media are looking to gain a greater foothold. Tai Hing Shing surveys the situation.
A tram makes its way through a street market in the North Point district of Hong Kong on 5 November 2021. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP)

The fight against Omicron reveals Hong Kong’s disunity

As the pandemic drags on with the new Omicron variant, Hong Kongers’ mistrust of the government is far from concealed. Some of them have taken to “resisting” government efforts in containing the pandemic. They, for example, have stopped using contact tracing apps or provided false information. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing reports.
A government banner of the upcoming Legislative Council election is seen through a reflection in Hong Kong on 22 November 2021. (Louise Delmotte/AFP)

First LegCo election under Hong Kong’s new electoral system: Tough road ahead for non-pro-establishment candidates

Following an overhaul of the electoral system in Hong Kong by the Chinese central government, both the pro-democracy and localist camps are not taking part in the upcoming Hong Kong Legislative Council elections, leaving a small number of moderate democrats who advocate dialogue with Beijing in the running. However, a severely fractured society in Hong Kong means that it will not be easy for them to be elected. Faced with the prospect of a LegCo that is likely to be made up of mainly pro-establishment voices, what is the way forward for Hong Kong?
People cross a road in the Central district of Hong Kong on 25 October 2021. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP)

It may soon be illegal to discriminate against mainland Chinese in Hong Kong

With a strong push by the pro-establishment camp, the Hong Kong government has made a breakthrough in legislative efforts against discrimination against mainlanders. But negative feelings did not happen overnight. With increasing mainland arrivals over the years, Hong Kongers have been feeling that their space, rights and even property are being encroached upon. Without solving the underlying issues, will legislation improve the situation much?