Tai Hing Shing

Journalist, Lianhe Zaobao

Tai Hing Shing is a Hong Kong- and Macau-based journalist with Lianhe Zaobao. He has been in the media industry for over a decade, focusing on Chinese diplomacy and Southeast Asian politics. He likes to analyse issues pertaining to Hong Kong and Macau from an international politics perspective.

Pedestrians cross a road in Hong Kong, China, on 15 October 2022. (Lam Yik/Bloomberg)

Hong Kong struggles to stop brain drain

Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing notes that Hong Kong has seen a mass exodus of talents in recent years, and many have cited exorbitant rent, lack of growth opportunities and other factors as major causes. The brain drain in key sectors will impact the special administrative region’s economic development, given the high dependence on skilled professionals. How should the authorities create opportunities and retain and attract talent?
A publicity poster for Warriors of Future. (Internet)

Hong Kongers are supporting Hong Kong films and making a political statement?

Hong Kong films have been doing well in the second half of this year, with several films among the top in box office takings. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing looks at the factors behind this strong showing, including government funding, cast appeal, pent-up demand due to the pandemic, and possibly an indirect way for people to express their political wants.
Housing flats in Sai Wan, Hong Kong, 5 September 2022. (CNS)

Hong Kong's property prices are falling. Will it continue?

Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing looks at the recent drop in Hong Kong’s property prices and asks: will the Hong Kong government take any measures to make sure the market remains stable, or allow the market to regulate itself?
Hong Kong Chief Executive-designate John Lee speaks at a news conference in Hong Kong, China, 19 June 2022. (Tyrone Siu/Reuters)

Taking stock of the new Hong Kong government’s achievements one month into office

The new Hong Kong administration led by Chief Executive John Lee has made notable progress in its one month of office, from controlling the spread of malaria to addressing emergencies that have caught the Hong Kong public’s concern. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing believes that the new government has been responsive, but it remains to be seen how it can implement effective policies to address long-standing issues such as the Covid-19 pandemic and the housing crisis.
A man waves the Chinese flag to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the city's handover from Britain to China, in Hong Kong on 1 July 2022. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP)

One country, two systems: Can Hong Kong hold on to its characteristics?

Despite Chinese President Xi Jinping’s recent speech reaffirming Hong Kong’s future as well as the “one country, two systems” policy, many are worried that Hong Kong’s unique advantages are weakening fast amid a tightening of political space. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing tells us more.
People wave Chinese and Hong Kong flags as fishing boats with banners and flags to mark the 25th anniversary of the Handover of Hong Kong from Britain to China sail through Hong Kong’s Victoria harbour on 28 June 2022. (Peter Parks/AFP)

‘New Hong Kongers’ entering politics must act in the interests of all Hong Kongers

Hong Kong’s incoming Chief Executive John Lee has nominated the next batch of senior officials, who have been duly appointed by China’s State Council. Many “new Hong Kongers” are gradually making their way into politics through various channels, facilitated by the central government in Beijing, who are not satisfied with the pro-establishment camp in Hong Kong. But can these new Hong Kongers show that they have the interests of all Hong Kongers at heart?
A girl takes a photograph beneath the flags of Hong Kong and mainland China, in Hong Kong, in this file photo. (CNS)

25 years after the handover: The ‘end for Hong Kong’ or just the beginning?

After the political and societal changes that have taken place in Hong Kong in the 25 years since the handover, what’s left in the aftermath? Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing ponders the nostalgic, the bittersweet and the hard realities of Hong Kong’s present and future.
This file photo taken on 22 March 2022 shows a woman collecting cardboard at a housing estate in Hong Kong. (Peter Parks/AFP)

Why HK civil servants' pay rise proposal is facing public outcry

Amid a bleak economic outlook, a pay increment has been proposed for Hong Kong’s civil servants, sparking criticisms that the Hong Kong government is out of touch with popular sentiment. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing observes that the backlash is not just a public outcry but a way for Beijing to vent its frustration against the civil servants too.
People are tested at a temporary testing site for Covid-19 in Hong Kong on 12 February 2022, as authorities scrambled to ramp up testing capacity following a record high of new infections. (Louise Delmotte/AFP)

'Zero-Covid' or living with the virus: Does Hong Kong know what it wants?

Hong Kong is facing its toughest Covid-19 test yet with Covid-19 variants proving tricky and daily cases going into the thousands. Some panicked Hong Kongers have taken flight to the mainland to avoid catching the disease. Others are questioning the “dynamic zero-Covid” policy, asking why Hong Kong can’t “live with the virus” as countries like Singapore are doing.