Protest

People chant slogans and hold the words "release (the protesters)" near a police-cordoned area to show support for a small group of protesters barricaded for over a week inside the Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus in Hung Hom district in Hong Kong on November 25, 2019. (Ye Aung Thu/AFP)

Social protests in the era of affluence

Social movements of today are no longer campaigns by the downtrodden poor but avenues for the well-educated middle class to air their anti-establishment discontent. Aided by social media, these groups appropriate concepts without understanding their true meanings, and look set to stay due to structural imbalance in the world caused by globalisation, technological progress and social divide. Zheng Yongnian opines that states badly need institutional reforms if they are to engage the social movements of today.
Is every comment and action an indication of support for independence for Hong Kong? (Kai Pfaffenbach/REUTERS)

OB Marker no more: The problematic "Independence" label (Part II)

Political commentator Leung Man-tao ruminates on the changing definitions of the "independence for Hong Kong" label. He worries that misuse of the term in times of instability will only diminish its significance as a political OB marker and further weaken the authority's power to get things done.
Wearing their hearts on their sleeves ( Philip Fong / AFP)

Six reasons for Hong Kongers to persevere: Let's do the LONGgame

Rather than an endgame, Simon Shen sees the current protests as part of a long game. Factors such as the milieu of the internet age and a growing Hong Kong identity will keep the die of Hong Kong’s future from being cast just yet.
The Chinese national flag (right) flies alongside the Hong Kong flag. (Anthony Wallace/AFP)

Wherein lies the future of Hong Kong?

Lance Gore opines that what is at stake in Hong Kong is really the Hong Kongers’ immediate interests, and the future of the Pearl of the Orient.  He spoke to protesters on the ground and found out that not only do they not identify in the least with mainland China, they overflow with resistance; not only do they feel no shame about Hong Kong’s colonial past, they are actually very proud of it. Wherein lies its future then?
This is even more true for professionally-trained police officers. If they are unable to control their emotions, they should not work on the front line. (REUTERS/Ammar Awad)

Pessimism, optimism and a family feud

With the Hong Kong protests intensifying by the day, what's your attitude towards it? Hong Kong correspondent Norman Yik's godson offers a different viewpoint as a Hong Kong youth. Norman shares his thoughts, and his godson's enlightening remark in this article.
I understand my mother far more than she understands me, despite the fact that we were never able to communicate properly, but what has scarred me for life is her conditioned reflex to the White Terror. (REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh)

Never another White Terror: Thoughts of a Hong Kong son

In this personal and reflective piece by political commentator Simon Shen, he articulates his relationship with his mother, the current situation in Hong Kong, and his family. What is his biggest wish for his daughters?
A march in Causeway Bay, in solidarity with the student protester who got shot by police with live ammunition in Hong Kong, China. (Susana Vera/Reuters)

Hong Kong will not be sacrificed: The problematic "Independence" label (Part I)

After over 100 days of protests in Hong Kong, the phrase "Hong Kong independence" has been raised, not just in Hong Kong itself, but also in Taiwan. But what does that concept really entail, and is it truly feasible? Hong Kong political commentator Leung Man-tao casts doubts on the sincerity of some Taiwanese supporters of the Hong Kong movement.
“I do not advocate independence for Hong Kong.” (Kyle Lam / Bloomberg)

Joshua Wong: I do not advocate independence

In this exclusive interview with Lianhe Zaobao, Joshua Wong Chi-fung boldly shares his views on Hong Kong's current political situation and his plans on running for local office. He rebukes that if China had made good on its promise of holding democratic elections in Hong Kong, “(We) wouldn’t be protesting on the streets now”.
How would the way towards the end be paved? (Mohd Rasfan / AFP)

So begins the ENDgame

Hong Kong is in turmoil. What would the trajectory towards the final scenario be like? Can the whole affair come to a good end? Influential Hong Kong political commentator Leung Man-tao believes that possibility has evaporated completely.