Semiconductors

Supporters await the arrival of Chinese President Xi Jinping in San Francisco, California, US, on 14 November 2023. (Jason Henry/AFP)

How changes in China's investment environment will impact the world

Japanese academic Toshiya Tsugami analyses China's recent trade and investment flows amid US-China rivalry, highlighting the EV and semiconductor sectors which have become key battlegrounds in the competition between China and the West. How will development plans for the Chinese market and the global business environment be affected?
People visit Huawei's flagship store in Tianjin, China. (Weibo)

Huawei’s EV partnership yields unexpected hit

To maintain Huawei’s consumer products sales channels, Richard Yu, chairman of Huawei’s smart car unit, created Huawei Smart Selection model to partner with automakers to make cars and sell them at nearly 60,000 Huawei phone stores across the country. But the Smart Selection model is not without variables and risks from its partners. Caixin Global journalists tell us more.
Pedestrians walk past an advertisement for Huawei's Mate 60 series smartphones outside a Huawei store in Shanghai, China, 8 September 2023. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Has China’s chip sector reached the end of the line?

While many are impressed by the release of Huawei’s Mate series smartphone equipped with 7-nanometre chips, some would believe that China has reached the pinnacle of its semiconductor development. Commentator Gu Erde takes a look at China’s chip sector thus far as it grapples with the US's tech blockade.
Semiconductor chips are seen on a circuit board of a computer in this illustration picture taken 25 February 2022. (Florence Lo/Reuters)

ASEAN's role in the global semiconductor race

Academics Lili Yan Ing and Ivana Markus take stock of the current state of the global semiconductor race between China and the US. While ASEAN is looking to capture a part of the high-tech equipment and supply chain, it still needs to navigate the complex US-China rivalry.
An advertisement for the Huawei Technologies Co. Mate 60 series smartphone in Shanghai, China, on 17 September 2023. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

[Big read] What is the US’s next move as China breaks through the chip blockade?

China’s Huawei suddenly launched a new smartphone, equipped with a 7-nm chip said to be made in China and with network speeds reaching 5G levels, shocking the US political circles. What far-reaching impacts will China's breakthrough in chip technology have? How will Washington respond? Lianhe Zaobao correspondent Edwin Ong takes us through the recent developments and what it means for the US’s strategy against China’s tech advancements.
People walk past a Huawei store with advertisements for the Mate 60 series smartphones, at a shopping mall in Beijing, China, on 30 August 2023. (Yelin Mo/Reuters)

Is China emerging from the chip chokehold with Huawei's Mate 60 Pro smartphone?

Amid the China-US tech war, US sanctions dealt a great blow to Huawei's growth and development. However, the company's launch of a new, apparently 5G, phone was announced during US Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo’s visit to China. Is it sending a message to the US that China’s technological development cannot be stopped? Lianhe Zaobao associate editor Han Yong Hong gives her take on the issue.
A Chinese flag is displayed next to a "Made in China" sign seen on a printed circuit board with semiconductor chips, in this illustration picture taken 17 February 2023. (Florence Lo/Illustration/File Photo/Reuters)

Biden's tech investment ban: What's at stake for China?

The US’s latest round of investment restrictions on China hits the country where it hurts — access to innovation ecosystems. Will China develop its own ecosystems fast enough? Researcher Ding Ke weighs in on the issue.
The quantum race is not like the space race, or most other tech races; it is more science than technology. (iStock)

Quantum tech isn’t a typical tech race

With heightened tensions between the US and China, it’s easy to reach for Cold War analogies, says science journalist Dan Garisto. But the quantum race is not like the space race, or most other tech races. That’s because quantum tech — despite the name — is more science than technology. If quantum tech is in its infancy, it should not be viewed in the same light as semiconductors and other currently critical technology. In fact, seen as science and not a deployable technology, quantum tech leaves much scope for cooperation.
The central business district in Beijing on 17 July 2023. (Jade Gao/AFP)

Beijing unrattled despite weak Q2

While China's housing market and exports are down, its consumption figures look to be improving and there are bright spots in the renewable energy and semiconductor sectors, says China research analyst Chen Long. A huge stimulus is unlikely to be in the offing, as Beijing still seems convinced that a more organic rebound, while slow and gradual, is better than a quick, policy-driven one.