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Protesters hold coffins displaying a picture of Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) and Myanmar military chief Senior General Min Aung Hlaing (right) during a demonstration in New Delhi on 3 March 2021, to protest against the military coup in Myanmar. (Prakash Singh/AFP)

Why the Chinese are confused by ‘ungrateful’ anti-China sentiments in Myanmar

Chinese academic Fan Hongda notes that mutual benefit is the real driver of bilateral relations, and expecting “gratitude” for maintaining ties is not the way to go. China would do well to rethink its mindset in international relations and the role it plays in the world.
An aerial shot of people walking through the Zhuyuwan Scenic Area and admiring the blooming flowers in Yangzhou, Jiangsu province, China, 21 February 2021. (Xinhua)

Qing dynasty ‘eccentric’ painter Zheng Banqiao: Art is commodity and beauty is physical

From a laser-etched calligraphy in a restaurant, art historian Chiang Hsun delves into the writings of Qing dynasty painter and calligrapher Zheng Xie, better known as Zheng Banqiao. Zheng was part of the “Eight Eccentrics of Yangzhou” group of painters who had wealthy businessmen patrons and developed an aesthetic grounded in the material and secular. Bright and colourful scenes of mirth were common — unlike the Song and Yuan dynasty literati before them who indulged in melancholic musings above worldly concerns. Contemporary ink artists may want to get some inspiration from Zheng's works, and boldly declare the feelings and observations of the times.
OSIM International CEO Charlie Teo. (OSIM)

[Sponsored content] 28 years in China, Singapore brand OSIM continues to thrive amid the pandemic

Since its inception in 1980, homegrown massage chair specialist OSIM International has striven to gain and maintain its foothold as one of the world’s leading wellness brands. China, with its vast market, is an important piece of the puzzle. OSIM’s presence in China for 28 years is not without its travails, but through constant innovation and a willingness to adapt to change, it continues to find a way to thrive amid the competition. CEO Charlie Teo shares the OSIM experience.
A protester holds up a sign of detained Myanmar civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi as they take part in a demonstration outside the Chinese Embassy against the military coup in Yangon on 13 February 2021. (STR/AFP)

From Yangon to Hong Kong: Why locals attack mainland Chinese companies during political unrest

Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing notes that mainland Chinese companies in Hong Kong, Yangon and elsewhere often find themselves targets of attack. Why are they so unpopular in the very communities they seek to bring greater economic activity to? Perhaps they are expanding too much, too soon and too fast, giving little opportunities for locals to adapt. But their work cultures probably also play a big role. 
Motorists travel past a screen displaying stock figures in Shanghai, China, on 18 February 2021. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

Innovation and ‘new retail’ driving the Chinese economy

Commentator David Ng explores the changes that are happening in China with developments in technology that allow vast changes in business models, from traditional offline transactions to online business, and “new retail”, which combines the two. How will the Chinese economy grow under these forces?
A man wearing a face mask walks past a dragon head decoration outside a mall in Bangkok on 21 January 2021. (Romeo Gacad/AFP)

Land Bridge in place of Kra Canal: Game changer for Thailand's future engagement with region and China?

The idea of the Kra Canal, prevalent in the 18th and 19th centuries, resurfaced in the late 1990s as the Khlong Thai or “Thai Canal” idea. However, the high investment costs, massive and unpredictable adverse environmental impacts, and security implications have all weighed against its realisation. A mega project proposal that envisions building a “Land Bridge” between Chumphon Province on the Gulf of Thailand and an enlarged deep-sea port in Ranong Province on the Andaman Sea has now been touted, supported by the Prayut administration. Academic Termsak Chalermpalanupap examines the options.
US President Donald Trump gestures during a campaign rally at Pickaway Agriculture and Event Center in Circleville, Ohio on 24 October 2020. (Mandel Ngan/AFP)

Donald Trump: The true 'Monkey King'?

Hong Kong commentator Chip Tsao observes that America's elites' hatred for Donald Trump is comparable to how the Chinese Nationalist government once detested Mao Zedong. Despite being a real estate tycoon, Trump entered the White House on the platform of making America great again. Whether he has done it is another matter, but the fact that he continues to play the outsider taking on the upper echelons on both sides of the spectrum suggests that it might be time for the American people and others to rethink what’s truly left and right.
A news report on Chinese President Xi Jinping's speech in the city of Shenzhen is shown on a public screen in Hong Kong, 14 October 2020. (Roy Liu/Bloomberg)

Xi's five-year plan for Shenzhen: A hard road ahead?

Shenzhen has grown rapidly over the past 40 years, such that its GDP reached a massive 2.7 trillion RMB in 2019. Just this month, the Chinese government released a five-year plan to make Shenzhen a “pilot demonstration area for socialism with Chinese characteristics”. Amid plans for reforms and new initiatives, EAI academic Yu Hong asks: How much autonomy will Shenzhen have, and what challenges will it face?
Xi Jinping, China's president, speaks during the United Nations General Assembly seen on a laptop computer in Hastings on the Hudson, New York, US, on 22 September 2020. President Xi Jinping took a veiled swipe at the U.S. in a strongly worded speech, saying no country should "be allowed to do whatever it likes and be the hegemon, bully or boss of the world." (Tiffany Hagler-Geard/Bloomberg)

The blacklist: When will China pull the trigger?

China’s new Unreliable Entity List seems to be an echo of US actions. But while the list looks like a potentially lethal tool, it has to be wielded prudently in order not to hurt China’s economy or cause anxiety. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu examines the factors involved.