Business

A news report on Chinese President Xi Jinping's speech in the city of Shenzhen is shown on a public screen in Hong Kong, 14 October 2020. (Roy Liu/Bloomberg)

Xi's five-year plan for Shenzhen: A hard road ahead?

Shenzhen has grown rapidly over the past 40 years, such that its GDP reached a massive 2.7 trillion RMB in 2019. Just this month, the Chinese government released a five-year plan to make Shenzhen a “pilot demonstration area for socialism with Chinese characteristics”. Amid plans for reforms and new initiatives, EAI academic Yu Hong asks: How much autonomy will Shenzhen have, and what challenges will it face?
Xi Jinping, China's president, speaks during the United Nations General Assembly seen on a laptop computer in Hastings on the Hudson, New York, US, on 22 September 2020. President Xi Jinping took a veiled swipe at the U.S. in a strongly worded speech, saying no country should "be allowed to do whatever it likes and be the hegemon, bully or boss of the world." (Tiffany Hagler-Geard/Bloomberg)

The blacklist: When will China pull the trigger?

China’s new Unreliable Entity List seems to be an echo of US actions. But while the list looks like a potentially lethal tool, it has to be wielded prudently in order not to hurt China’s economy or cause anxiety. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu examines the factors involved.
Street vendors wait for customers at their vegetable stalls in Jingzhou, 27 March 2020. (Aly Song/REUTERS)

Street stalls: Saviour of livelihoods for ordinary Chinese after Covid-19?

Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei once ran a stall selling slimming pills, and Alibaba founder Jack Ma used to sell small items in Zhejiang. In the wake of the Covid-19 crisis, the street stall economy is making a comeback in China. These stalls were popular in the 1980s and 1990s but declined with efforts by authorities to clean up the streets. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan weighs the pros and cons of reviving the street stall economy.
A woman walks past Vietnam national flags along a street in Hanoi, 18 May 2020. (Nhac Nguyen/AFP)

Foreign investors exiting China: Vietnam milks the gains

Vietnam stands to benefit from MNCs’ efforts to diversify their production base beyond China. How much it will actually benefit, however, depends on how fast it can roll out measures to further improve its infrastructure and business environment.
A deliveryman walks past a closed Luckin Coffee store at Sanlitun, Beijing, China on 7 February 2020. (Jason Lee/File Photo/Reuters)

Misbehaving US-listed Chinese enterprises and their gambler attitudes

Chinese companies listed on US stock exchanges such as Luckin Coffee and iQiyi have been embroiled in accounting scandals of late, causing investors to eye Chinese concept stocks with doubt. What can Chinese companies with hopes of gaining access to foreign investment do to improve their bad reputations by association?
Chinese RMB banknotes are seen behind an illuminated stock graph in this illustration taken on 10 February 2020. (Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo/Reuters)

China's yet-to-be-announced stimulus package: Dispensing the right dose

In the aftermath of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, China trotted out a mega stimulus package that some analysts say did more harm than good. Months into the coronavirus pandemic and China’s support measures have still been measured. How much further will it go in the coming weeks to alleviate the economic strain on enterprises and individuals?
Empty streets are seen amid the coronavirus pandemic on April 15, 2020 as stay at home order has been extended in Washington, DC until May 15. (Daniel Slim/AFP)

The Great Lockdown: How to ensure a speedy recovery?

With the IMF forecast of a 3% contraction in the global economy for 2020, the economic outlook for a coronavirus-ravaged world is grim. Cai ponders how the world can pick itself up after going through what the IMF terms “the Great Lockdown” and the onslaught of “the worst recession since the Great Depression, and far worse than the Global Financial Crisis”.
An employee at a factory in Wuhan, April 6, 2020. (STR/AFP)

US companies in China: No place that can take China's place

Despite a proposed White House executive order to reduce dependence on China for medical supplies, and a promise by US National Economic Council President Larry Kudlow that the US government will pay for US companies to return home, US companies in China are not biting. Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing speaks to some company leaders to find out why.
Will US companies heed the call to "go home"? (Yasin Akgul/AFP)

How many US companies will leave China?

US National Economic Council director Larry Kudlow has recently called for US companies to leave China and move back to the US. Hong Kong columnist David Ng gives his take on how likely it is that US companies will heed the call.