China 70th anniversary

Police are seen at the scene where bodies were discovered in a lorry container, in Grays, Essex, Britain on October 23, 2019. (REUTERS/Peter Nicholls)

CNN’s provocation and China’s irritation

The case of the Essex truck deaths remain inconclusive as investigations are still ongoing. Why then, did CNN jump the gun and conveniently assume the bodies were of Chinese nationality, and from there go on to associate the whole incident with the PRC’s celebration of its 70th anniversary? Correspondent Lim Zhan Ting opines that if the truth is not accurately portrayed, or if there is a loss of neutrality, the basis of any sharp questions will be shaken, and such efforts will ultimately prove to be futile.
China is finding out how it fits in on the world stage. (SPH)

China will shake the world: World stage (Part II)

In this two-part article, we explore China’s progress from a poor, underdeveloped country to an economic superpower, with a major impact on world affairs. How has this been possible? What does it mean for the rest of the world?
Hu Sen wanted to study and be a researcher or university professor, and had no intention of starting a business. In the end, he left Yale and became an entrepreneur. (Photo: Lim Zhan Ting)

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part IV): Hu Sen

(Video and text) With the advent of the Internet age, new opportunities opened up in the tech field for those daring enough to seize them. This is the story of one who made that decision.
Zhang Yuting, aged 9, with her mother.

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part V): Zhang Yuting

(Video and text) As China moves forward, some young people want a simple life close to nature, even as they are plugged into the world of online clicks and likes.
Huang Juan (third from the right) in a group photo with her colleagues from the China Construction Bank. (Photo: Huang Juan)

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part III): Huang Juan

(Video and text) This is the story of a woman's leap of faith in leaving 24 years of civil service behind to follow her heart.
Tang Jinglin, his wife, and his daughter, now city-dwellers. (Photo: Tang Jinglin)

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part I): Tang Jinglin

(Video and text) The story of a teacher farmer who worked hard his whole life to finally live in the city. Yet, a part of him will always remain with the fields. “A farmer can never be separated from his land at any time. Peace of mind comes only with land ownership,” he says. 
China celebrates its 70th anniversary. (iStock)

Mao Zedong to Xi Jinping – Five generations of CPC leaders

On the 70th anniversary of the People's Republic of China, we present a series of interviews with five ordinary people of China as they reveal their extraordinary lives. As an opener, we begin by taking a look at developments in China under its five leaders.
In 1974, Qiu Yaotian (second from left) was given a recommendation to study Chinese at the Shuangyashan Normal School, the most important turning point in his life. (Photo: Qiu Yaotian)

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part II): Qiu Yaotian

(Video and text) At 20, Qiu Yaotian became a zhiqing and was part of the border support exodus. He endured harsh living conditions, his university dream was shattered. Yet, he pulled through and is enjoying his twilight years, busy with things he had no chance to do in his younger days. What then, is his last concern?
Cartoon: Heng Kim Song

ThinkCartoon

Heng Kim Song has been the freelance editorial cartoonist