Huawei

A pro-democracy activist holds his phone while queueing to pay respects to mark the one year anniversary of a man who fell to his death after hanging a protest banner against the now-withdrawn extradition bill on the scaffolding outside a shopping mall, in Hong Kong on 15 June 2020. (Anthony Wallace/AFP)

National security law for Hong Kong: The US will not back down, so where are we headed?

The proposed national security law for Hong Kong is speedily moving along, with the draft text recently reviewed at the 19th session of the Standing Committee of the 13th National People’s Congress. Nonetheless, US researcher Wei Da says that this issue is a trigger point that impinges on bottom lines that could set off serious conflict and repercussions in the Taiwan Strait. Is the onset of a hot war unfolding before our eyes?
China’s rise will not be thwarted by the US. (iStock)

The US will accelerate its own decline by suppressing China

US academic Han Dongping shows that by all intents and purposes, China does not wish to take up the dominant position in the international system. But this does not mean that the US will stop feeling threatened by it and continue trying to thump China down. Like a game of whac-a-mole, China’s rise will not be thwarted and it will keep coming back, he says.
The US flag and a smartphone with the Huawei and 5G network logo are seen on a PC motherboard in this illustration taken on 29 January 2020. (Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo/Reuters)

Cut-throat competition for world-class chips: The end of Huawei?

Greater restrictions have been imposed by the US in recent months to choke off US-related chip-making supplies to Huawei. As the noose tightens around its neck, it has to think fast about how it can produce its own chips domestically to minimise the impact.
The Huawei logo is pictured at the IFA consumer tech fair in Berlin, Germany, on 6 September 2019. (Hannibal Hanschke/File Photo/Reuters)

Amid the pandemic, is the China-US tech war firing up again?

The pandemic rages on in the US, but the Trump administration is not letting up on its efforts to keep Huawei in check. Will the China-US tech war come to the fore again as the political stakes are raised on both sides?
China and the US are deep in competition in the 5G technology arena. (iStock)

Who is winning the 5G technology race?

Yesterday, British Conservative MPs‘ attempt to block "high-risk vendors’" such as Huawei from UK telecommunications networks failed. Amid the battle against coronavirus, China and the US continue their race in 5G technology. China is widely acknowledged to be a leader in 5G, but is the US really falling behind? Professor Zhu Ying weighs up opinions on both sides of the debate.
Huawei is reshaping US-UK-China relations. (Toby Melville/Reuters)

What is behind the UK’s decisive stance on Huawei?

US President Donald Trump was furious when his friend, British Prime minister Boris Johnson, decided to give Huawei a role in building the UK's 5G infrastructure. German Chancellor Angela Merkel seems to be going a similar direction in a position paper announced yesterday. Chinese academic Zhang Jingwei ponders the UK's move and thinks ahead to implications that it may have on the UK's wider relations with China and the US.
Mr Lee Kuan Yew left behind many incisive comments about China and the US. (SPH)

What would Lee Kuan Yew make of the China-US trade war?

Mr Lee Kuan Yew may have passed on, but his views survive. What might he have thought about the current China-US trade war? Zhu Ying looks at Mr Lee’s comments about China and the US for some clues.
Huawei's image is badly damaged after the wrongful detention of its ex-employee, Li Hongyuan. (REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke)

Public anger over Huawei subsiding

Public anger over the wrongful 251-days detention of Huawei ex-employee Li Hongyuan may be subsiding, but Huawei’s damaged reputation may not be easily salvaged in the short term. Lianhe Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan observes that public opinion is a double-edged sword. Companies have to be extremely sensitive when it comes to managing their public relations.
Huawei has found itself the target of public anger following an incident involving the wrongful detention of a former employee. (Hannibal Hanschke/REUTERS)

Huawei under fire over jailed ex-employee

Chinese telecom giant Huawei is facing a tide of public anger from within China, following its handling of an incident involving a former employee who was wrongly jailed for 251 days. Lim Zhan Ting explores how Huawei landed itself in this position and what it can do to recover its image.