Patriotism

This Taiwan’s Ministry of National Defense handout picture taken and released on 24 August 2022 shows a US-made 155mm howitzer firing during a drill at Penghu islands. (Handout/Taiwan's Ministry of National Defense/AFP)

Cross-strait reunification is not a precondition for China’s national rejuvenation

The Chinese government should not cave in to nationalist voices keen on equating reunification with China’s national rejuvenation, says East Asian Institute senior research fellow Lance Gore. Given the strength of the PLA, neither the US nor its allies are keen or have the capability to engage in a direct conflict with China. Rather than overreacting at every premeditated provocation, the mainland should have confidence in coming to a common understanding with Taiwan and work on improving its international image.
Internet personality Sima Nan is caught in yet another storm of polarised public opinion. (Wikimedia)

'Patriotic' Chinese internet celebrity attacked by netizens for owning US house

Some Chinese netizens are furious with internet personality Sima Nan, known for his anti-US rhetoric, for owning a house in the US. Sima has blamed the onslaught of public opinion on Lenovo, claiming that the enterprise has plotted against him. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan suggests that people such as Sima who incite disputes and conspiracy theories will gradually lose ground in China's online public space.
A map showing locations where the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) will conduct military exercises and training activities including live-fire drills, is seen on newspaper reports of US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan, at a newsstand in Beijing, China, 3 August 2022. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

Pelosi’s Taiwan visit reveals the ugliness of Chinese nationalism

Despite the bluster and big talk of the Chinese government warning against US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi visiting Taiwan, the visit did happen, leading to China’s “red fans” asking why no “real” action was taken. It did not help that well-known nationalist figures like former Global Times editor-in-chief Hu Xijin lent their voices to fanning the flames of nationalism, ultimately leading to disappointment and anger.
People wearing face masks following the Covid-19 outbreak walk past a Chinese flag in Shanghai, China, 2 August 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Class struggle and extreme nationalism have become CCP’s ideological weapons

Commentator William He notes the disturbing nature of extreme nationalism in China, citing numerous examples of how perverse Chinese “patriotism” can be. He attributes this phenomenon to long-term brainwashing by the Chinese Communist Party, where Chinese people are taught from a young age what to think and say about other countries and their own.
The Xuanzang Temple in Nanjing. (Internet)

Corruption in China seeps into the Buddhist world

Amid the controversy over honouring Japanese war criminals, Xuanzang Temple in Nanjing has found itself in more hot water as its former abbot Chuanzhen was exposed for his connections in the business and official circles. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu gives a profile of this senior monk and what his secular activities mean for the temple and for Buddhism.
Hong Kong Chief Executive John Lee attends question and answer session at Legislative Council, in Hong Kong, China, 6 July 2022. (Lam Yik/Reuters)

The Hong Kong story according to John Lee amid criticisms from the West

At his first Legislative Council meeting on 6 July, Hong Kong Chief Executive John Lee laid out his work plan and likened Hong Kong to a “gentleman” that has to respond robustly to attacks from “nasty people” bent on smearing the city. Zaobao’s associate editor Han Yong Hong examines how he plans to tell the Hong Kong story well.
A worker wearing protective gear and standing behind a fence in a residential area under Covid-19 lockdown talks with a man on a scooter in the Xuhui district of Shanghai, China, on 16 June 2022. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

Singaporean in China: The Chinese netizens speaking up for their fellow men

Chinese netizens may get things wrong or even be out of line sometimes, but it is also their persistence in speaking up on Chinese social media that has got the authorities on their toes. At the very least, their willingness to make a stand shows they have a certain faith and hope in their fellow countrymen and their government to effect change.
Eileen Gu at the Beijing Winter Olympics, 10 February 2022. (Mike Blake/Reuters)

Chinese netizens questioning Eileen Gu's identity and loyalty

Skiing star Eileen Gu has announced that she will be an ambassador for Salt Lake City’s bid for the 2030 or 2034 Winter Olympics, sparking online debate in China. In today's increasingly polarised world, can a "globalised" person gain acceptance and recognition from conflicting parties and be that communicator of goodwill?
This file photo taken on 22 March 2022 shows a woman collecting cardboard at a housing estate in Hong Kong. (Peter Parks/AFP)

Why HK civil servants' pay rise proposal is facing public outcry

Amid a bleak economic outlook, a pay increment has been proposed for Hong Kong’s civil servants, sparking criticisms that the Hong Kong government is out of touch with popular sentiment. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing observes that the backlash is not just a public outcry but a way for Beijing to vent its frustration against the civil servants too.