China workplace

Workers work at a demolition site, following the Covid-19 outbreak, in Shanghai, China, 9 September 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

[Future of China] China's economy now and in the future

Amid the difficulties in analysing and forecasting macroeconomic conditions, economist Chen Kang likens their changes to a unique game of tug of war between the bulls and the bears — in which economic reforms, policies and outcomes are interpreted differently among the players, and the current outcome encapsulates the people’s aggregate response. However, the big question is whether China will press on with economic reforms despite all the challenges. This is the third in a five-part series of articles on the future of China.
People wait at an intersection on a street during morning rush hour, in Beijing's central business district, China, 2 August 2022. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

China's economic recovery has become a political issue

Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu notes that China is facing multiple headwinds that are making its economic recovery all the more elusive. From dealing with incessant Covid-19 outbreaks to the real estate crisis, economic recovery has become a dire political issue, especially with the impending 20th Party Congress to be held later this year.
​A security guard and a volunteer behind a fence surrounding a residential neighbourhood placed under lockdown due to Covid-19 in Shanghai, China, on 6 July 2022. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

Covid discrimination in China affecting work and everyday life

Discrimination against those who have had Covid-19 doesn’t only happen among neighbours and friends, but at the workplace and between localities too, says Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing. This discrimination is based on irrational fear and stems from China’s tight zero-Covid measures.
A Chinese flag flutters near people lining up to get tested at a makeshift nucleic acid testing site, amid Covid-19 outbreak in Beijing, China, 18 May 2022. (Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Why Xi Jinping's bold experiments with socialism are commendable

While China’s market-based socialism with Chinese characteristics has lifted many out of poverty, creating the Chinese miracle, the ills of abiding by the “laws of the market” should be tackled and reined in. In the ever-evolving model of new socialism, a mechanism needs to be established that can raise and maintain a good standard of living in the absence of economic growth. This is so that people can transcend the pursuit of the material and live their lives with meaning and purpose.
Graduates attend their graduation ceremony in the Macau University of Science and Technology in Macau, China, on 5 June 2022. (CNS)

Post-00s youths want to rewrite workplace norms in China

In pursuit of better working conditions, China's post-00s generation has gained a reputation for being newbies who are difficult to manage and who show their superiors little respect. While those who go to extremes may be in the minority and some admire their brave fight for workplace rights, ultimately, they may be putting their job prospects in jeopardy.
The Tangshan incident revealed that the gangsters' violence derives from the age-old patriarchal ideology pervading Tangshan to some extent. (Illustration: Lorna Wei)

A personal account of Tangshan's dreadful societal culture

The Tangshan assault case unearths deeper societal issues such as an insidious guanxi culture that has condoned the practice of turning a blind eye. Worse, ordinary folk no longer even bat an eyelid at such “norms” anymore. When that happens, is the recent violence enough to jolt society and the authorities to do things differently?
In this file photo taken on 22 March 2022, Tesla CEO Elon Musk is pictured as he attends the start of the production at Tesla's "Gigafactory" in Gruenheide, southeast of Berlin. (Patrick Pleul/AFP)

Elon Musk: The American boss with a 'Chinese heart'

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has sent a warning to his staff: come back to the office or leave Tesla. Even as more companies are accepting remote and flexible working arrangements, is Musk merely putting into words what many bosses have not said? Zaobao’s China Desk looks at whether the days of working from the office are really numbered.
This photo taken on 13 April 2022 shows a worker producing industrial robots at a factory in Wuhan, Hubei province, China. (AFP)

Why China has too many graduates and not enough skilled workers

Despite a record number of graduates entering the job market this year, China is seeing a shortage of skilled tradesmen, especially for the manufacturing industry. Chinese economics professor Li Jingkui believes that the main reason for the talent demand gap is China’s education system, which is driven by remnants of the backward ideology of the ancient feudal society.
Graduates attend a graduation ceremony at Central China Normal University in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, 13 June 2021. (Stringer/Reuters)

Record 10.76 million Chinese university graduates face bleak job market and struggling economy

With over ten million Chinese university students set to graduate this year, the competition for jobs will be more intense than ever, and it does not help that certain sectors are scaling back recruitments for various reasons. Can the potential mismatch of jobs and skills be rectified? And will the impact of youth employment difficulties spill over to other areas?