Hong Kong youths

A protester waves a US and a colonial Hong Kong flag at a rally in Hong Kong. (Leah Millis/REUTERS)

Beijing no longer “Grandpa” to young Hong Kongers

Hong Kongers used to call Beijing “Grandpa”. But the recent protests and the district council elections show that they no longer see mainland China as an authority figure. Tai Hing Shing analyses how Beijing lost its standing in Hong Kong.
A demonstrator wears an anonymous mask, also known as a Guy Fawkes mask, and an American flag during the "Thanksgiving Day Assembly for Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act" at Edinburgh Place in the Central district of Hong Kong, China, on Thursday, Nov. 28, 2019. (Justin Chin/Bloomberg)

Short-term wins and long-term losses for Hong Kong

What made Hong Kongers stand with the rioters during the recent district council elections? Does this landslide victory for the pro-democracy camp really count as a win for Hong Kong? How will Beijing react? Veteran China affairs journalist and associate editor of Zaobao Han Yong Hong gives her opinion.
A protester wears the Guy Fawkes mask during a prayer rally in Tamar Park in Hong Kong on November 9, 2019, in memory of university student Alex Chow. (Philip Fong/AFP)

Darker days lie ahead for Hong Kong

Weekday or weekend, Hong Kong has become a battleground with universities — erstwhile symbols of civility — turning into base camps and refuel stations. What is happening to the Hong Kong as we know it?
Is every comment and action an indication of support for independence for Hong Kong? (Kai Pfaffenbach/REUTERS)

OB Marker no more: The problematic "Independence" label (Part II)

Political commentator Leung Man-tao ruminates on the changing definitions of the "independence for Hong Kong" label. He worries that misuse of the term in times of instability will only diminish its significance as a political OB marker and further weaken the authority's power to get things done.
Wearing their hearts on their sleeves ( Philip Fong / AFP)

Six reasons for Hong Kongers to persevere: Let's do the LONGgame

Rather than an endgame, Simon Shen sees the current protests as part of a long game. Factors such as the milieu of the internet age and a growing Hong Kong identity will keep the die of Hong Kong’s future from being cast just yet.
The Chinese national flag (right) flies alongside the Hong Kong flag. (Anthony Wallace/AFP)

Wherein lies the future of Hong Kong?

Lance Gore opines that what is at stake in Hong Kong is really the Hong Kongers’ immediate interests, and the future of the Pearl of the Orient.  He spoke to protesters on the ground and found out that not only do they not identify in the least with mainland China, they overflow with resistance; not only do they feel no shame about Hong Kong’s colonial past, they are actually very proud of it. Wherein lies its future then?
Night falls as a lone protester walks on the street. (Anthony Wallace/AFP)

Too little, too late and the wrong measures for HK

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam delivered "The Chief Executive's 2019 Policy Address" on October 16, amidst Hong Kong’s worst political crisis since the 1997 Handover. She announced housing plans and living subsidies to low-income households. Economist Prof Paul Yip opines that these are too little, too late and the wrong measures for current Hong Kong.
This is even more true for professionally-trained police officers. If they are unable to control their emotions, they should not work on the front line. (REUTERS/Ammar Awad)

Pessimism, optimism and a family feud

With the Hong Kong protests intensifying by the day, what's your attitude towards it? Hong Kong correspondent Norman Yik's godson offers a different viewpoint as a Hong Kong youth. Norman shares his thoughts, and his godson's enlightening remark in this article.
“I do not advocate independence for Hong Kong.” (Kyle Lam / Bloomberg)

Joshua Wong: I do not advocate independence

In this exclusive interview with Lianhe Zaobao, Joshua Wong Chi-fung boldly shares his views on Hong Kong's current political situation and his plans on running for local office. He rebukes that if China had made good on its promise of holding democratic elections in Hong Kong, “(We) wouldn’t be protesting on the streets now”.