Stock market

A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City, US, 29 August 2022. (Reuters/Brendan McDermid)

Breaking the ice in the China-US audit standoff

In a preliminary agreement, US officials will get their long-sought access to vet accounting companies based in mainland China and Hong Kong and review audit documents related to Chinese businesses. Will this stem the tide of Chinese companies being delisted from US stock exchanges?
A pedestrian walks past a giant display showing the Shanghai Composite Index, in Shanghai, China, 3 August 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

China-US audit inspection deal does not mean greater financial cooperation

China-US cooperation in the finance sector is making headway after the announcement of the recent signing of an audit oversight cooperation agreement. While the general public opinion in China bears optimism for this development, some are still wary of the risks to national security. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan looks into the implications of the agreement.
Air Force soldiers prepare to load US-made Harpoon AGM-84 anti-ship missiles in front of an F-16V fighter jet during a drill at Hualien Air Force Base in Taiwan on 17 August 2022. (Sam Yeh/AFP)

Three big changes in China-US competition after Pelosi’s Taiwan visit

In the wake of US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s controversial visit to Taiwan and the mainland’s retaliatory actions in the Taiwan Strait, researcher Wei Da believes that China-US rivalry has transformed in three ways: political confrontation is becoming more ideological and acute; military confrontation is becoming more symbolic; and further decoupling of major economic and trade initiatives may reach a critical point.
A vehicle drives past a screen displaying the Hang Seng Index at Central district, in Hong Kong, China, 19 July 2022. (Lam Yik/Reuters)

'Homecoming' listings heat up in Hong Kong

US and Chinese regulators have been ramping up talks to resolve the longstanding audit dispute under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (HFCAA). In the meantime, will US-listed Chinese companies flock to Hong Kong? Is the city able to offer a profitable haven for investors?
People walk along a street in Beijing, China, on 26 July 2022. (Noel Celis/AFP)

Financial decoupling: China’s next step amid intensifying China-US rivalry?

Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan notes that the announcement of Chinese SOEs’ planned exit from the US market is a result of the intensifying China-US rivalry, and a sign of economic and financial decoupling. However, the exit might be just the beginning — there may be more Chinese companies pulling out of the US market in future.
Pedestrians cross a street in Tokyo's Ginza district on 17 July 2022. (Philip Fong/AFP)

At US$3.2 trillion, Japan's overseas assets is still expanding

Economics professor Zhang Rui believes that Japan’s massive hoard of overseas assets, along with its ultra-loose monetary policy, has allowed its domestic economy to thrive even amid a weakening currency. In addition, the government’s fiscal policies have also made it easy for Japanese investors to venture overseas, adding to Japan’s financial prowess.
A man walks past an electronic display showing the Hang Seng Index in the Central district of Hong Kong on 27 May 2022. (Bertha Wang/AFP)

Geopolitics affecting HK's financial market. Can Singapore benefit?

Amid US-China tensions, mainland China companies blacklisted by the US are expected to expand their presence in Hong Kong. While it may seem that the special autonomous region will reap the benefits, NUS academic Ben Charoenwong says investors are in fact wary of the costs involved and may look to other financial hubs like Singapore. But is Singapore ready to fill that role?
A plane of China Eastern Airlines lands at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China, 23 March 2022. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

China's aviation industry suffers double mishap of pandemic and plane crash

Zaobao’s China Desk analyses the impact of the recent China Eastern Airlines crash, touted as China’s worst aviation disaster since 2010. This comes at a time when China has been improving its flight safety record and its airlines are struggling to recover from the losses suffered from the Covid-19 slowdown. Will the aviation industry regroup and come back stronger from this?
An electronic screen displays the stock figures for companies including Tencent Holdings Ltd., Meituan and Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. in Hong Kong, China, on 15 March 2022. (Paul Yeung/Bloomberg)

No funding, no market. What now for China's tech companies?

The US capital market has been the main source of large-scale funding for Chinese tech companies, even as they compete for a slice of their home market. However, with the ongoing US-China trade war and Russia-Ukraine war, US capital is not flowing as readily into China as before, while China’s anti-monopoly crackdown has narrowed down tech companies’ growth prospects. Tech expert Yin Ruizhi explores the issue.