Stock market

People walk past the New York Stock exchange (NYSE) and the 'Fearless Girl' statue at Wall Street after heavy rainfall on 30 November 2020 in New York City, US. (Angela Weiss/AFP)

Wall Street, foreign investment hankering for China deals despite US sanctions

Even as the US government blacklists several Chinese companies for being “Chinese Communist military companies” or a national security threat, Wall Street does not seem fazed; investors seem prepared to put their money where their mouth is when it comes to betting on China.
A logo of Ant Group is pictured at the headquarters of the company, an affiliate of Alibaba, in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, 29 October 2020. (Aly Song/File Photo/Reuters)

Regulating new technologies: Singapore and China can work together

Law experts Tan Chong Huat and Amanda Chen observe that the recent halting of Ant Group’s dual listing on the Hong Kong and Shanghai stock exchanges augur more regulatory changes in the micro-loans industry. While this lowers financial stability risk, will more of such regulations hinder fintech advancements? Where’s the middle ground? In their opinion, there is much that Singapore and China can learn from each other in the regulation of emerging technologies.
This file photo taken on 17 September 2018 shows Alibaba Group executive chairman Jack Ma preparing to deliver a speech during the main forum of the World Artificial Intelligence Conference 2018 (WAIC 2018) in Shanghai. (STR/AFP)

China's tightening fintech regulations may benefit Ma Yun's Ant in the long term

The writing was on the wall, but what changes has fintech company Ant Group’s recent IPO suspension sped along for the online microfinance industry? Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing takes a closer look.
A booth of digital finance products is seen at a fair during the INCLUSION fintech conference in Shanghai, China, 24 September 2020. (Cheng Leng/Reuters)

With Ant Group's record $34.5 billion IPO suspended, what happens next?

Jack Ma’s fintech company Ant Group had it all planned out. It would bypass American stock exchanges and proceed with a dual listing on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and Shanghai’s STAR market, which would have raised an estimated US$34.5 billion, the biggest IPO in history. Now that the IPO has been suspended, what happens next?
A deliveryman walks past a closed Luckin Coffee store at Sanlitun, Beijing, China on 7 February 2020. (Jason Lee/File Photo/Reuters)

Misbehaving US-listed Chinese enterprises and their gambler attitudes

Chinese companies listed on US stock exchanges such as Luckin Coffee and iQiyi have been embroiled in accounting scandals of late, causing investors to eye Chinese concept stocks with doubt. What can Chinese companies with hopes of gaining access to foreign investment do to improve their bad reputations by association?