Internet

A person walks past a sign of Alibaba Group during the World Artificial Intelligence Conference in Shanghai, China, 1 September 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Rebirth of China's tech companies possible through regulatory reforms

While it appears that large digital platforms in China have been hit hard by a series of regulatory reforms in the last few years, they are down but not out, says researcher Jia Kai.
In this file photo taken on 12 October 2022, people walk along a pedestrian street surrounded by shops and shopping malls in Shanghai, China. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

China's private sector has continued its rise against all odds

Peterson Institute of International Economics researchers Tianlei Huang and Nicolas Véron analyse the seeming anomaly that an increasingly statist policy environment in China has not prevented a rapid rise of the private sector. While various factors have paused this rise, will the upward trajectory likely resume in President Xi’s third term?
A person walks past a JD.com advertisement for the "618" shopping festival displayed outside a shopping mall in Beijing, China, 14 June 2022. (Carlos Garcia Rawlins/File Photo/Reuters)

Chinese internet giants gear up for global e-commerce push

Amid tightening Covid-19 controls, disrupted logistics and e-commerce user base plateauing in 2020, Chinese e-commerce companies are facing tightened scrutiny and slowing growth in revenue. Furthermore, advertising — the most important source of revenue for internet companies — has been weak for more than a year. This leads Chinese tech companies to turn their attention overseas, and those without an overseas development plan will be left behind. Caixin journalists tell us more.
People ride on scooters across a street during morning rush hour, in Beijing, China, 2 August 2022. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

[State of our world] The world will be very different from the one we're used to

In a changed world post-pandemic and against the backdrop of the war in Ukraine, Asia will face pressure from competing minilateral coalitions amid the breakdown of multilateralism and the weakening global and regional institutions. This time, it may not be so easy not to take sides, says Professor C. Raja Mohan. This is the second in a series of four articles contemplating a changing world order.
Silhouettes of laptop users are seen next to a screen projection of binary code are seen in this picture illustration taken 28 March 2018. (Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo/Reuters)

Web3 with Chinese characteristics: Finding China's solution for regulators, developers and users

Crypto ban notwithstanding, China’s getting firmly in the act of building Web3 infrastructure to its specifications. While China is unlikely to allow global Web3 to play a role in its economy or the lives of its citizens, Chinese developers and entrepreneurs remain fascinated by the promise of global Web3 platforms and cryptocurrencies. This portends the development of two blockchain markets in China: one which caters to those who “jump” the virtual fence to join in the global Web3 movement, and one which uses blockchain in line with Beijing’s vision.
Internet personality Sima Nan is caught in yet another storm of polarised public opinion. (Wikimedia)

'Patriotic' Chinese internet celebrity attacked by netizens for owning US house

Some Chinese netizens are furious with internet personality Sima Nan, known for his anti-US rhetoric, for owning a house in the US. Sima has blamed the onslaught of public opinion on Lenovo, claiming that the enterprise has plotted against him. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan suggests that people such as Sima who incite disputes and conspiracy theories will gradually lose ground in China's online public space.
People look on as a Chinese military helicopter flies past Pingtan island, one of mainland China's closest points from Taiwan, in Fujian province, on 4 August 2022, ahead of massive military drills off Taiwan following US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to the self-ruled island. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

Has China’s propaganda on the Taiwan situation failed its public?

Amid the tense situation arising from US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan, the Chinese public have made loud cries against China’s seemingly disappointing response. Academic Zhang Chengxin assesses what led to such sentiments and how they can be abated.
People walk past the headquarters of the Chinese ride-hailing service Didi in Beijing, China, 3 December 2021. (Thomas Peter/File Photo/Reuters)

Does end of Didi probe signal new beginnings for China’s internet economy?

With the economic and political blowback from its regulatory crackdowns in the past two years, coupled with economic pressures from the pandemic, the Chinese authorities may be ready to ease up on high-pressure regulations of the internet sector.
People wearing face masks walk out of a subway station during morning rush hour in Beijing, China, 26 April 2022. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

Patriotism has become a commodity on Chinese social media

Chinese internet celebrities have landed in hot water since social media platforms began displaying the IP addresses of posts by verified accounts. Netizens are crying foul as the locations of these individuals have potentially exposed the deception and falsehoods in their content and “patriotic” personae. Is this the end for the “patriotic Big Vs”?