Entertainment

Chinese fans attend mainland China's first official fandom event for science-fiction adventure franchise Star Trek, at a shopping mall in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2023. (Jade Gao/AFP)

Hollywood in China: The cycle of boom and bust

Academic Ying Zhu explains why political and diplomatic tensions aside, the business of motion pictures has its own commercial logic so Hollywood and its Chinese counterpart will continue to be locked in a transactional relationship, though more surreptitiously and in a much more low-key fashion.
The Milky Way seen as night falls over Taiwan. (iStock)

Taiwanese art historian: Are Libras and Leos always a perfect match?

Taiwanese art historian Chiang Hsun muses on his encounters with a Libra who took him on a historical exploration, and a Leo that pushed Taiwan’s film industry into the world stage. Do the rules of attraction truly dictate that Libras and Leos themselves are compatible, even if they despise each other?
People pose during the Rock Home Town festival in Shijiazhuang, China on 4 September 2023. (Andrea Verdelli/Bloomberg)

China's red-hot concert market is driving tourism consumption

Following the pandemic, pent-up demand for live concerts is driving up ticket prices to astronomical levels. Amid a less than encouraging economy, people are generally cutting down on non-essential spending, but the hope is that concerts will encourage travel and consumption and revitalise the economy. Lianhe Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing takes a closer look at the situation.
Chinese singer Dao Lang's song Luocha Haishi (罗刹海市, Rakshasa Sea City) has recently gone viral. (Internet)

Why a 'nonsense song' is all the rage in China

Hua Language Centre director Chew Wee Kai gives his take on nonsense songs, from children’s rhymes to the latest viral hit in China — Luocha Haishi by Dao Lang. At first glance, these ditties seem to indulge one’s imaginations, but on closer inspection, they offer commentaries on the world.
Thai (L) and the Taiwanese (R) version of The Prince Who Turns Into A Frog, a story of a rich young man who falls in love with a young woman after losing his memory. (Internet)

How Thailand is remaking TV dramas, from Taiwan's Meteor Garden to China's Addicted

Over the past decade or so, Thailand has come up with its own remakes of popular shows from overseas, from Chinese and Korean dramas to Taiwanese idol series. Producers have learnt that they need to inject their own uniqueness to the remade dramas to find an audience, including the large Chinese market. In recent years, Thailand’s own brand of “boys’ love” or BL dramas have even found favour with many of the source markets of its remade dramas. Zaobao correspondent Wang Yingmin talks to production companies and viewers to understand the pull of Thai TV series.
This photo taken on 10 May 2023 shows the latest version of a robot called Sophia being tested at Hanson Robotics, a robotics and artificial intelligence company which creates human-like robots, in Hong Kong, China. (Peter Parks/AFP)

AI Stefanie, scams and fake news: China acts on AI regulation

The tech sector has seen a massive shift since the introduction of OpenAI’s ChatGPT in November last year. The AI wave has brought much trepidation for its potential in advancing education, innovation and more; but along with it comes new challenges, especially those that raise copyright infringement issues or break the law. Lianhe Zaobao’s China Desk looks into how AI has been misused in China and the responses.
Cartoon: Heng Kim Song

ThinkCartoon

Heng Kim Song has been the freelance editorial cartoonist

Li Haoshi, stage name House, got into trouble after a joke about the People's Liberation Army. (Internet)

Can stand-up comedians cross lines and tackle taboos in China?

A Chinese stand-up comedian has landed himself in trouble after cracking a joke seeming to compare the People’s Liberation Army with dogs. Lianhe Zaobao correspondent Wong Siew Fong finds out why people are up in arms, and if the authorities’ slew of punishment is justified.
Standees in a shopping mall in Fuzhou, Fujian province, China, to promote The First Slam Dunk, 20 April 2023. (CNS)

China's youths love Japanese anime, no matter what anyone says

Anime is one of Japan’s best-known global exports, and it is hardly surprising that anime has maintained its popularity in China even amid the highs and lows of China-Japan relations, not least with the two biggest releases in recent years, The First Slam Dunk and Suzume. Zaobao’s China Desk examines the appeal of anime.