Gaming

A man plays an online game on a computer at an internet cafe in Beijing, China, 31 August 2021. (Florence Lo/File Photo/Reuters)

A metaverse with Chinese characteristics?

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg recently said, “Think of the metaverse as an immersive virtual world where people can spend time together and hang out, much like you can do today with virtual reality, dialed up to 11.” Stocks of companies working on constructing the said metaverse have been on the rise. China, with its huge video game market, should have a head start in this realm, but authorities are sounding words of caution. They fear the metaverse will be as ephemeral as it seems and worse, even harder to regulate. How will it get a piece of the pie in its own way?
A woman walks past a sign of the Financial Street in Beijing, China, 9 July 2021. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

Why China is cracking down on big capital

It is not new for the evils of capitalism to be criticised in China. But the recent crackdowns on whole sectors, be it tech, tuition centres, or online gaming, has businesses wondering what just hit them. Is this the state’s way of showing who’s boss, and how will China’s economic vibrance be affected?
Visitors are seen at the Tencent Games booth during the China Digital Entertainment Expo and Conference, also known as ChinaJoy, in Shanghai, China, 30 July 2021. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Can strict regulations save Chinese youths from gaming addiction?

A recent article in China harshly criticised online gaming as a “spiritual opium”, leading to speculation that online gaming, as well as gaming companies such as Tencent, might be the next target of China’s regulatory agencies. Zaobao’s China Desk takes a closer look at what might be in store.
An employee plays a video game at the Espot gaming centre in Paris, on 31 May 2021. (Stephane de Sakutin/AFP)

When the virtual world is fairer: Why more youths are addicted to gaming

Technology specialist Yin Ruizhi examines the psychology of getting into “the zone” when playing games and the comfort of being immersed in a more egalitarian world.
A Tencent Games sign is seen at the China Digital Entertainment Expo and Conference (ChinaJoy) in Shanghai, following the Covid-19 outbreak, China, 31 July 2020. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Mobile gaming: The cash cow of China’s mobile phone industry

Few realise that the mobile gaming industry and the mobile phone industry have a symbiotic relationship. Technology specialist Yin Ruizhi explains how cuts of the revenue that mobile companies get from game app developers help them to thrive despite offering "value for money" phones.
"You can't convince everyone."

[Comic] A Chinese youth's search for meaning in life

What would an idealistic young Chinese person say to those who prefer to live their life in the virtual world, or who are willing to give up their voices in exchange for little comforts? Or who choose to turn a blind eye to the plight of others, as long as one is well looked after? Is it possible to convince others to be idealistic? Or does one have to look for inspiration and support from the ancients? Young comic artist Bai Yi from China shares her thoughts. 
A shop for Chinese telecom giant Huawei features a red sticker reading "5G" in Beijing, 25 May 2020. (Nicolas Asfouri/AFP)

China looks forward to a new world of 5G connectivity

The China-US 5G race has led to the rapid growth of certain industries, in particular, e-sports and working on the go. Technology specialist Yin Ruizhi examines the possibilities of 5G technology.
A man walks past a billboard showing an advertisement for a smartphone. (Athit Perawongmetha/REUTERS)

Internetisation of life and the new social divide

In the Internet Age, the great divide is not between the haves and the have-nots, but the weak-willed who succumb easily to online advertising and those who are above lowly distractions. The former will end up paying the price of a free Internet.