Domestic consumption

In this photo taken on 30 March, consumers line up and wait to enter a mall in Wuhan after it resumed operations. (CNS)

Wuhan businesses' quest for survival after 76-day lockdown

To help businesses get back on their feet, the Wuhan municipal government recently announced that it is raising 20 billion RMB to roll out a rescue package for small and medium enterprises (SMEs). On the ground, many companies find themselves in more dire straits now than when the city was under a complete lockdown, and business owners are generally not confident of surviving the present downturn.
Medical staff at a hospital in Wuhan, 5 February 2020. (Xiong Qi/Xinhua)

[Big Read] Wuhan waits for a turning point

The new coronavirus has not yet peaked but is already having serious impacts on the people and businesses of Wuhan and China. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu looks at the micro and macro effects of the epidemic, from personal accounts to medical and economic forecasts, in this big read on Wuhan.
Queues that last for hours on end are characteristic of first stores. Pictured here is a long queue outside Taotaoju Restaurant.

"First stores" and "China cool": A new era in Chinese consumerism

Shanghai correspondent Yang Danxu observes that domestic consumption in China is getting a second wind from “first store” openings and a “China cool” wave led by time-honoured brands that have found the sweet spot between the old and new.
Tiffany & Co. held its grand exhibition at the Fosun Foundation Shanghai, themed "Vision & Virtuosity". (Photo: Yang Danxu)

The myth of China’s solid consumer demand

Why relying on domestic consumption to sustain China’s economy is putting one’s eggs all in one (wrong) basket.