Equality

People walk through an alley decorated with traditional lanterns near Houhai lake in Beijing, China, on 2 February 2022. (Noel Celis/AFP)

US academic: Equality is a myth, whether in the US or China

Wu Guo notes that equality is very much a mirage, whether in the socialist or liberal democracy conception of the term. The sum total of one’s head start in life is often tied to his or her family background. And often, no amount of levelling up can change that. But this does not mean that equality is of no relevance or should not be aspired to. Adopting an attitude of equality can help ensure that people’s rights are protected, even if the ideal of equality may never be achieved.
A gay pride parade in Taiwan, 2018. (Wikimedia)

Taiwan allowing cross-strait same-sex unions: A bargaining chip in the reunification tussle?

Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council (MAC) has announced proposed amendments to the “Cross-Strait Act” to allow same-sex unions between partners from Taiwan and mainland China. Is this a bid by Taiwan to woo the gay community in mainland China ahead of reunification, as some netizens speculate? And will mainland China adopt an even more conservative position given that room to discuss LGBT issues has shrunk amid recent clampdowns? Zaobao’s China Desk delves into the topic.
People look at images of late chairman Mao Zedong of the Chinese Communist Party at the Museum of the Communist Party of China that was opened ahead of the 100th founding anniversary of the Party in Beijing, China, 25 June 2021. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

China idol: Mao Zedong makes a comeback among Chinese youth

China’s youth today are turning to Mao Zedong for inspiration amid a crushing sense of social immobility and injustice. But Wang Qingmin recalls the Mao era to be one of violent political struggles, anti-intellectualism, and cult of personality. Is a return to Mao really the answer?
A mother carrying her child in an alley near Houhai Lake in Beijing, China on 4 May 2021. (Noel Celis/AFP)

Gender equality: The solution to China’s declining birth rate

Providing better support for families to play effective co-parenting roles is more likely to improve birth rates than sending women back to the kitchen, says Chen Jing.
A man rides a bicycle as snow falls in New York's Times Square on 18 February 2021.(Kena Betancur/AFP)

Is America falling apart?

The US is doing a re-evaluation of several problems long embedded in its class system, culture and history. Han Dongping says that amid sharp divides in values and beliefs, every individual has a role to play to help resolve issues in a peaceful manner, so that the US avoids the danger of descending into civil war. But are the two major political parties ready to lead and take on the challenge?
People walk in Qianmen area in Beijing, China, 4 October 2020. A significant rebound in domestic travel over the Golden Week holiday is fueling optimism that consumers are starting to spend again after the pandemic-induced slump. (Yan Cong/Bloomberg)

Socialism and Nazism: Branches of the same tree?

While Nazism and socialism fall on opposite ends of the spectrum, they are more alike than they seem. Hong Kong commentator Chip Tsao points out that both ideologies began with similar intentions, but took divergent paths to meet their objectives and garnered different reactions from the West.
China today faces a lack of social trust. (iStock)

How to build a society of trust in China

Zheng Yongnian says a severe lack of social trust in China is fostered by a loss of traditional rules and norms, as well as a lack of modern universal laws. This explains why, when in trouble, most Chinese people avoid seeking legal remedy, preferring to turn to their social connections (关系 guanxi) instead. He argues that focusing on people, giving autonomy to social groups and improving the rule of law are key to rebuilding that trust.
30 couples tie the knot on 11 November 2019 at Guangzhou, wearing traditional Chinese wedding gowns. The picture shows the groom unveiling his bride. (CNS)

No bride price, no marriage in China

The practice of commoditising marriage through a “bride price” to be paid by the Chinese groom has grown to incredible proportions in recent years, especially in the rural areas of China. Untenable financial burdens aside, this practice is not doing women’s push for gender equality any favours.