Media

People line up to be tested for Covid-19 next to a poster showing China's President Xi Jinping on a bulletin board in Beijing, China, on 31 August 2022. (Jade Gao/AFP)

China censors discussion on WHO's assessment of pandemic

Despite state media dispelling the misunderstanding that China’s zero-Covid policy would become a long-lasting basic national policy, Zaobao correspondent Wong Siew Fong notes that the Chinese people are still wary of how much longer the strict measures will persist, especially amid the sudden censorship of specific search terms related to the end of the pandemic on social media. Is there an end in sight for the strict anti-epidemic measures?
Demonstrators hold placards with pictures of Aung San Suu Kyi as they protest against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, 22 February 2021. (Stringer/File Photo/Reuters)

What do the official Chinese media’s mixed messages on the Myanmar coup mean?

China’s willingness to side with the Myanmar military and the SAC regime has been evident since the immediate aftermath of the February 2021 coup, despite its apparently mixed messages, say researchers Su Mon Thazin Aung and Nan Lwin. Through its state media, China has in fact consistently transmitted messages largely in favour of the military takeover of its smaller neighbour and sought to pin anti-Chinese sentiment in Myanmar on the West's moves.
Children play with sand near a Taiwan Navy supply ship at a beach on Nangan island of the Matsu Islands in Taiwan, 16 August 2022. (Ann Wang/Reuters)

Why Chinese Singaporeans will be torn if war breaks out over the Taiwan Strait

Zaobao associate editor Peter Ong observes that members of the Chinese community in Singapore hold diverse views on reunification and other issues, and have varying levels of emotional ties to the mainland and Taiwan. If war breaks out, it will not be distant like the war in Ukraine, but stir up different feelings in the Chinese community. Remaining objective would be hard but necessary.
People look on as a Chinese military helicopter flies past Pingtan island, one of mainland China's closest points from Taiwan, in Fujian province, on 4 August 2022, ahead of massive military drills off Taiwan following US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to the self-ruled island. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

Has China’s propaganda on the Taiwan situation failed its public?

Amid the tense situation arising from US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan, the Chinese public have made loud cries against China’s seemingly disappointing response. Academic Zhang Chengxin assesses what led to such sentiments and how they can be abated.
A sailboat with a slogan celebrating the 25th anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover from Britain to China sails at the Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong, 27 June 2022. (CNS)

To leave or not to leave: The cry of Hong Kong’s youth

As the 25th anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover draws near, Hong Konger Thomas Chan reflects on the changes that have taken place over the last few years and the real and pressing issue of residents, especially the young, drifting away. Most are seeking better prospects abroad in a wry turn of events from a time when the city was viewed as the land of opportunity. Now, amid dreary skies and Telegram alerts announcing yet another citizen-police chase, the city stands forlorn as it watches its people leave.
Cartoon: Heng Kim Song

ThinkCartoon

Heng Kim Song has been the freelance editorial cartoonist

A member of the Ukrainian Territorial Defence Forces looks at destructions following a shelling in Ukraine's second biggest city of Kharkiv on 8 March 2022. (Sergey Bobok/AFP)

From real war to online war: Small states need smarter skills to survive a multipolar internet age

Former journalist Goh Choon Kang says that despite having international law and organisations to improve global governance, the law of the jungle still applies in the 21st century. And small states such as Singapore will invariably be caught between powers such as the US, China and Russia to varying degrees. And in the multipolar internet age, even if one is not embroiled in a real physical war, an online war of opinions could also impact societies across the world.
Competitors in a cross-country skiing event at the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics, National Cross-Country Centre, Zhangjiakou, China, 16 February 2022. (Lindsey Wasson/Reuters)

Media coverage of Beijing Winter Olympics shows parallel worlds

It seems that the Chinese and foreign media have very different approaches to covering the Beijing Winter Olympics — Chinese journalists want to portray the favourable side of the Games while foreign journalists tend to take a more critical stand in focusing on problems. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu examines this phenomenon.
This photo taken on 6 January 2022 shows a vendor sorting newspapers at a newsstand in Hong Kong. (Peter Parks/AFP)

As HK pro-democracy media exits the scene, mainland media swoops in

The media landscape in Hong Kong is facing great upheaval, following the closures of prominent pro-democracy media such as Apple Daily and Stand News. Hong Kong pro-democracy media refugees have since taken their work overseas but few believe commentaries from afar can fill the gap of public discussion left in Hong Kong. Meanwhile, mainland-friendly media are looking to gain a greater foothold. Tai Hing Shing surveys the situation.