Housing

A building under construction in Shenzhen, China, on 19 November 2022. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

Can China save its property market and economy amid fastest-spreading outbreak to date?

Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu takes a look at China’s ailing property market and the various measures taken by property companies and the authorities to boost sales and ensure that homes are completed and handed over to buyers. While the intention is good, will they work under the current Covid-19 situation?
This photo taken on 13 July 2022, shows a housing complex under construction in Dongguan, in China's southern Guangdong province. (Jade Gao/AFP)

China’s overreliance on land finance could lead to its downfall

Retired economist Zeng Yongchang shares his views on China’s land finance policies — while quick and efficient, land finance is unsustainable, as evidenced by the widening inequality, intensifying social conflicts and dire economic situation.
A worker pushes a trolley along a road outside a construction site at the central business district in Beijing, China, on 8 July 2022. (Wang Zhao/AFP)

Has China’s monetary policy reached its limit?

China's central bank is scrambling to increase demand for borrowing by using nearly every instrument in its toolbox. But the impact has so far been limited, as Chinese companies and households are trapped in a crisis of confidence in the economy amid slowing growth and the impact of strict anti-Covid measures. What more can China do to save the economy?
Men work at a construction site of apartment buildings in Beijing, China, 15 July 2022. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

Can SOEs' property buying spree save China's ailing property market?

Recent news of a large-scale housing project acquisition by a state-owned enterprise (SOE) has gained widespread attention. While some are welcoming the government’s efforts to revive the sluggish property market, others are wary of profiteering and corruption opportunities. Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing takes a look at the implications of the SOE’s move and whether China’s property market will finally look up.
Workers work at a demolition site, following the Covid-19 outbreak, in Shanghai, China, 9 September 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

[Future of China] China's economy now and in the future

Amid the difficulties in analysing and forecasting macroeconomic conditions, economist Chen Kang likens their changes to a unique game of tug of war between the bulls and the bears — in which economic reforms, policies and outcomes are interpreted differently among the players, and the current outcome encapsulates the people’s aggregate response. However, the big question is whether China will press on with economic reforms despite all the challenges. This is the third in a five-part series of articles on the future of China.
Housing flats in Sai Wan, Hong Kong, 5 September 2022. (CNS)

Hong Kong's property prices are falling. Will it continue?

Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing looks at the recent drop in Hong Kong’s property prices and asks: will the Hong Kong government take any measures to make sure the market remains stable, or allow the market to regulate itself?
Air Force soldiers prepare to load US-made Harpoon AGM-84 anti-ship missiles in front of an F-16V fighter jet during a drill at Hualien Air Force Base in Taiwan on 17 August 2022. (Sam Yeh/AFP)

Three big changes in China-US competition after Pelosi’s Taiwan visit

In the wake of US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s controversial visit to Taiwan and the mainland’s retaliatory actions in the Taiwan Strait, researcher Wei Da believes that China-US rivalry has transformed in three ways: political confrontation is becoming more ideological and acute; military confrontation is becoming more symbolic; and further decoupling of major economic and trade initiatives may reach a critical point.
People wait at an intersection on a street during morning rush hour, in Beijing's central business district, China, 2 August 2022. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

China's economic recovery has become a political issue

Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu notes that China is facing multiple headwinds that are making its economic recovery all the more elusive. From dealing with incessant Covid-19 outbreaks to the real estate crisis, economic recovery has become a dire political issue, especially with the impending 20th Party Congress to be held later this year.
An aerial view of the Hainan International Convention and Exhibition Center in Hainan province, China, 24 July 2022. (CNS)

Here’s how Hainan can become the next financial hub

Hainan is set to become China’s first free trade port and has great potential to beef up its financial offerings. Academics Pei Sai Fan and Chen Jingwei present a number of suggestions that could boost the Chinese province’s standing as an international hub for financial and regulatory innovations, green financing and connectivity.