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People cross a road in the Central district of Hong Kong on 25 October 2021. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP)

It may soon be illegal to discriminate against mainland Chinese in Hong Kong

With a strong push by the pro-establishment camp, the Hong Kong government has made a breakthrough in legislative efforts against discrimination against mainlanders. But negative feelings did not happen overnight. With increasing mainland arrivals over the years, Hong Kongers have been feeling that their space, rights and even property are being encroached upon. Without solving the underlying issues, will legislation improve the situation much?
A woman wearing a protective face mask walks by a mural in Manhattan's Chinatown district of New York City, US, 2 June 2021. (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)

Chinese economics professor: The New York I saw was not the New York I read about in books

Chinese economics professor Li Jingkui is pensive as he visits New York City for the first time. Rather than the romanticised versions of the city he had read about, the New York he encounters in Flushing, Queens is gritty and a whole other reality. But he reflects that as societies and cultures continue to evolve, fighting for dominance in a state of chaos, the side they show to the world will sometimes be different but always real.
The Chinese community in Singapore has developed in a way that is unique to its time and place. (SPH)

Trees in a forest: Becoming Chinese Singaporean in multicultural Singapore

A metaphor used by playwright Kuo Pao Kun and recently mentioned by Finance Minister Lawrence Wong says that different cultural communities are trees in the forest, each separated at the trunk, but nourished by the same soil and cross-pollinating high in the sky at the leaves and branches. Low Sze Wee, CEO of the Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre, extends the metaphor, noting that Chinese Singaporeans have developed distinct cultural identities from Chinese elsewhere. Their way of life is a combination of what they brought with them, their interactions with others, and the policies they live under with their fellow citizens.
People walk on the historic Doyers Street in Chinatown that has been painted over by Chilean-born street artist Dasic Fernandez, 24 June 2021 in New York City, US. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images/AFP)

Price of the American dream: Do immigrants have to forget their past?

Wu Guo, a US academic and first-generation immigrant finds that second- and third-generation immigrants, whether Asian Americans or otherwise, are more keen to trace their roots the more their parents and grandparents try to shield them from certain memories. Maybe more oral history projects and open discussion of the past will build stronger American identities?
CASA, an advocacy organisation for Latino and immigrant people and other immigrant advocacy groups, rally outside the White House in Lafayette Park, to demand that the Biden administration take action on citizenship for all on 26 May 2021 in Washington, DC. (Mandel Ngan/AFP)

Chinese academic: Developing nations must be wary of internet platform companies and their capital

Qiao Xinsheng points out that one should not have any expectations about the globalisation of the job market. In the internet economy era, even though internet platform companies facilitate capital’s global search for talent, this has not improved labour’s freedom of movement in search of better job opportunities. Cheap labour will continue to be exploited through the long arms of overseas capital. Not only that, with these companies' technology-enabled capabilities to collect massive amounts of data, national security will be a concern.
A police officer walks by a mural while on a foot patrol in Chinatown on 18 March 2021 in San Francisco, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images/AFP)

Have Chinese Americans fallen behind Indian Americans in the business and political fields?

Stereotypically, Chinese Americans and Indian Americans are often compared in terms of their cultural traits with some drawing the conclusion that these traits have led the Chinese to fall behind in the business and political fields. Are the Chinese Americans really at a disadvantage in these areas? What are their strengths then?
The People's Liberation Army Navy Qinzhou Type 056 corvette docked at the Central Military Dock at Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong, China, 29 March 2021. (Paul Yeung/Bloomberg)

When 'new Hong Kongers' run the show, where do the old ones go?

It is clear that the Beijing government wants to have more say in the governance of Hong Kong, not least with the recent passing of the bill to change Hong Kong’s electoral system allowing more new migrants from mainland China to be part of the Election Committee. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing charts the rise of these “new migrants” in Hong Kong and the political force they are becoming. How will their increasing assertiveness affect the dynamics between the new and old migrants, as well as the locals?
A person holds up a sign during a "Stop Asian Hate" rally at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, US, on 20 March 2021. (Mark Felix/AFP)

Anti-Asian hate crimes: Chinese Americans' weak and disparate voice in US society

Associate Professor Wu Guo analyses reactions from the Chinese American community to the recent spike in anti-Asian hate crime. He sees a clear distinction between those who see these acts as racially motivated, and those who feel that they should be taken as crimes against public safety and leave it to the police. Interestingly, the debates show that the Chinese themselves may hold certain prejudices against other ethnic groups in the US. Amid the increasing complexity of ethnic relations in the US, what steps can the Asian community take to protect their rights?
In this file photo taken on 4 December 2013, Chinese President Xi Jinping shakes hands with then-US Vice President Joe Biden (left) inside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China. Since his inauguration, Biden has yet to speak to Xi on the phone. (Lintao Zhang/Pool/File Photo/Reuters)

When will Biden call China?

Even with a new US president in place, US-China relations look set to remain uncertain as poor communication between them continues, like chickens and ducks trying to have a conversation. Except they’re not talking to each other at the moment — not on the phone at least.