State-owned enterprise

Cooperatives seem to be making a return in China, like this one in Heilongjiang. (Internet)

Cooperatives are making a comeback. Is China preparing for combat and famine?

Cooperatives that used to manage agricultural and other daily resources in China faded away during China's reform and opening up, but recently, they were highlighted again by the state media and promoted in various regions. Chinese people are concerned if this means that the government is going to further tighten its grip on the economy or that China is preparing for the likelihood of containment and even war?
A screen showing a video of Chinese President Xi Jinping in an exhibition area at the Siasun Co. facility in the Lingang Special Area in Shanghai, China, on 25 August 2022. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

A new breed of technocratic elites in the Xi era: Countdown to the 20th Party Congress

Li Cheng, director of the John L. Thornton China Center of the Brookings Institution, observes that a new breed of technocratic elites — the “technocrats 2.0” — have rapidly risen to the national leadership in China. What are the major differences between technocrats in the Jiang-Hu eras and the Xi era?
Men work at a construction site of apartment buildings in Beijing, China, 15 July 2022. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

Can SOEs' property buying spree save China's ailing property market?

Recent news of a large-scale housing project acquisition by a state-owned enterprise (SOE) has gained widespread attention. While some are welcoming the government’s efforts to revive the sluggish property market, others are wary of profiteering and corruption opportunities. Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing takes a look at the implications of the SOE’s move and whether China’s property market will finally look up.
Can China become fully self-reliant in the semiconductor industry? (iStock)

China’s semiconductor Great Leap Forward is doomed to fail

Political commentator Jin Jian Guo believes that the semiconductor Great Leap Forward pushed by the Chinese authorities could have the same devastating effects as the Great Leap Forward of the past. In an industry that is globally interconnected, persisting with the impossible endeavour of becoming fully self-reliant would only result in further instances of failing to learn from history.
A pedestrian walks past a giant display showing the Shanghai Composite Index, in Shanghai, China, 3 August 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

China-US audit inspection deal does not mean greater financial cooperation

China-US cooperation in the finance sector is making headway after the announcement of the recent signing of an audit oversight cooperation agreement. While the general public opinion in China bears optimism for this development, some are still wary of the risks to national security. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan looks into the implications of the agreement.
People walk along a street in Beijing, China, on 26 July 2022. (Noel Celis/AFP)

Financial decoupling: China’s next step amid intensifying China-US rivalry?

Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan notes that the announcement of Chinese SOEs’ planned exit from the US market is a result of the intensifying China-US rivalry, and a sign of economic and financial decoupling. However, the exit might be just the beginning — there may be more Chinese companies pulling out of the US market in future.
Astronauts (from left) Ye Guangfu, Wang Yaping and Zhai Zhigang wave during a ceremony ahead of the launch of the Long March-2F Y13 rocket, carrying the Shenzhou-13 spacecraft and them in China's second crewed mission to build its own space station, at Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center near Jiuquan, Gansu province, China, 15 October 2021. (Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Can commercial space programmes take off in China?

EAI academic Qian Jiwei notes that as China’s space capabilities increase, the field is being opened up to private companies. This move is likely to spark off greater innovation and efficiency for the industry and give China a leg up in the space race, but challenges exist in offering targeted policies and managing innovative outputs.
Paramilitary police members wearing protective face masks stand near surveillance cameras at the Bund, in Shanghai, China, 20 January 2022. (Aly Song/File Photo/Reuters)

China-focused multinational firms are facing increasingly complex legal environments

As one of the largest recipients of foreign investments, China has no shortage of publicly disclosed cases of corrupt business dealings. But transnational firms are still willing to take the risks and cultivate relationship-building strategies in their business activities. They are even prepared to face a “double jeopardy” situation when they are penalised in their home and overseas locations. But their operating environment could get even more challenging with the US and China clamping down on transnational crime, and the increasing use of domestic judiciaries to regulate extraterritorial legal matters.
Lenovo founder Liu Chuanzhi. (SPH)

Why Chinese netizens are attacking PC giant Lenovo and its founder Liu Chuanzhi

In recent weeks, two camps have formed over Lenovo and accusations that the latter has sold off state-owned assets on the cheap in an equity transfer deal a little more than a decade ago. Some are defenders of Lenovo, but the other more vitriolic camp is bent on bringing Lenovo to its knees. What are the underlying issues behind this wall of hate forming around Lenovo? Yu Zeyuan looks into the issue.