Post-90s

China's pet economy is taking off, driven by the one-child generation born in the 1980s and 1990s. (Internet/SPH)

China’s pet industry booms as the post-90s generation seeks to fill a void

The pet economy is thriving in China, driven mostly by the one-child generation who crave an emotional connection and young job seekers taking up “animal communication” gigs during the pandemic. Analysts are optimistic about this sector, where middle class households are more than willing to spend more on the physical and emotional well-being of their furkids. Zaobao correspondent Wong Siew Fong speaks to pet owners and business owners to uncover more about this emerging industry.
A woman wearing a face mask walks in the Central Business District in Beijing on 14 April 2020. (Wang Zhao/AFP)

China's grassroots civil servant and her story battling the Covid-19 pandemic

China's grassroots civil servants have been sandwiched between their demanding supervisors and the people, while braving the elements standing guard outside different communities and organisations throughout winter and spring during the pandemic. Young Chinese academic Lorna Wei tells the story of one of these non-medical frontline workers amid the tough fight as she salutes the numerous nameless heroes among them.
A couple poses for a wedding photographer as they postponed their marriage due to the Covid-19 pandemic, in Wuhan, China, on 14 April 2020. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

Chinese couples queuing up for divorce: Blame it on the coronavirus?

Appointments for divorce are fully booked on Shenzhen Civil Affairs Bureau’s marriage registry system. The next slot will only be available after mid-June. Divorce rates are on the rise in China, presumably due to increased frictions between couples brought about by extensive lockdowns. But a complicated web of social policies tied to one’s marital status, be it buying a house or getting a loan, may be the hidden lever tipping decisions towards divorce.
A couple wearing face masks cuddles along a park at the Yangtze river in Wuhan, Hubei, on 12 April 2020. (Noel Celis/AFP)

Death of a Peking University girl: Virginity matters in modern China

Baoli, a student at Peking University, committed suicide because of her boyfriend and died this early April. Young academic Lorna Wei examines the case and bemoans the sad situation of both men and women holding parochial attitudes in China towards a woman’s virginity. In extreme cases, the vulnerable may fall prey to grave self-harm, even death.
Young people wearing face masks amid concerns over the Covid-19 coronavirus walk dressed in Tang Dynasty costumes at Century Park in Shanghai on 22 March 2020. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

Is China’s younger generation having it better?

When a video depicting the rosy lives of youth in China went viral on China’s Youth Day (4 May), young and old Chinese alike stopped to ponder what kind of society the youth have inherited. Is it paved with gold, or just as rough around the edges as before? Amid new problems that a rising China faces today, the post-90s generation will just have to make this era their own, with all its foibles, just as their parents and earlier generations have done before them.
Tiffany & Co. held its grand exhibition at the Fosun Foundation Shanghai, themed "Vision & Virtuosity". (Photo: Yang Danxu)

The myth of China’s solid consumer demand

Why relying on domestic consumption to sustain China’s economy is putting one’s eggs all in one (wrong) basket.
Wolf Disco by Gem is the hottest song in China this year. (sohu.com)

The hottest song in China: Wolf Disco

What is the hottest song in China right now? Apparently, a little rap song called Wolf Disco has been making waves, with its take on what life was like in the late '90s and early 2000s. Journalist Yew Lun Tian is reminded of her own teenage years, as she delves into what makes this song so popular.
Zhang Yuting, aged 9, with her mother.

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part V): Zhang Yuting

(Video and text) As China moves forward, some young people want a simple life close to nature, even as they are plugged into the world of online clicks and likes.
China's Post-90s are caught in a whirlpool of uncertainties and are dissatisfied with their lives. (iStock)

China’s future through the lens of the Post-90s

All eyes are on China’s youths born in the affluent 1990s, are they satisfied with their lives? Are they confident in their country?