Healthcare

College students looking for suitable jobs at the job fair in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, 29 May 2022. (Yan Bo/CNS)

Depression among China's college students reveals anxieties about jobs and Covid

Even with the easing of lockdown measures across China, the prolonged uncertainty has left a deep impact on youths. The grim employment outlook, volatile pandemic situation, along with the lack of mental health support, have led to elevated feelings of anxiety and insecurity among the young generation.
A resident looks on behind barriers at a fruit shop, during lockdown, amid the Covid-19 pandemic, in Shanghai, China, 16 May 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Covid-stricken Shanghai is down, but is it out?

The seemingly unending lockdown in Shanghai has taken a toll on investor confidence, leading to some entrepreneurs and companies talking about leaving the city. Zaobao’s Shanghai correspondent Chen Jing surveys the short-term reactions and long-term outlook of China's top financial city.
A worker in a protective suit shows a QR code to residents lining up for nucleic acid testing, as the second stage of a two-stage lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) begins in Shanghai, China, 1 April 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

How China's health code app permeates daily life and may still play a role post-Covid

China’s use of the health code for pandemic control has illustrated the potential of digital technologies in the 21st century. However, there are concerns about the blurring of the lines between digital surveillance and public service provision, and fears that tech giants and local governments will take advantage of the greater access to personal data they have been given.
Customers buy instant noodles, following the Covid-19 outbreak, at a supermarket in Beijing, China, 25 April 2022. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

Pandemic in China: Will Beijing repeat Shanghai's mistakes?

Fears and anxiety from Shanghai’s dire Covid-19 situation is spreading to other cities. In particular, Beijing is now seeing panic buying and residents preparing for the worst. People are getting ready for a lockdown that may not even happen, but given their ordeal in the early outbreak of the pandemic in 2020, their fears are not unfounded. Zaobao's Beijing correspondent Yang Danxu reveals the situation on the ground.
Workers wearing protective gear look on as people wait to be tested for the Covid-19 coronavirus at a residential compound in Shanghai, China, on 18 March 2022. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

Why rumours spread faster than outbreaks in Shanghai

A recent false rumour of an impending lockdown in Shanghai led to panic buying and disorder not usually seen in Shanghai, a well-run city that follows the rules. But it is not so much that people can’t tell fact from fiction, but that recent U-turns by the officials have led people to start relying on the grapevine. What should the authorities do to win back the people’s trust?
A worker in a protective suit collects a swab from a resident at a residential compound under lockdown, in Shenzhen, Guangdong province, China, 14 March 2022. (CNS photo via Reuters)

Shenzhen's balancing act in fighting the pandemic

The dire pandemic situation in Hong Kong has trickled into Shenzhen through legal and illegal border crossings. However, the city has been trying its best to implement anti-epidemic measures without significantly impacting people’s daily lives. Chinese commentator Chen Bing notes Shenzhen's transparency and openness in tackling the pandemic situation, and how its policy differs from the one-size-fits-all measures of some Chinese local governments.
A policeman (centre) wearing protective clothing reacts in an area where barriers are being placed to close off streets around a locked down neighbourhood after the detection of new Covid-19 cases in Shanghai, China, on 15 March 2022. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

As the virus spreads, can China calm its people and contain the outbreaks?

This month China has seen its worst outbreak since the start of the pandemic two years ago. Shanghai, once seen as a role model for fighting the virus, is succumbing under the weight of increasing infections. As such, the “Shanghai model” which allows for a balance of anti-epidemic measures and economic activity has been pushed into the spotlight. Can the Shanghai model still be emulated by other regions of China? Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu looks at the various issues discouraging China from easing its anti-epidemic measures and policy.
A man wearing a mask as a prevention against Covid-19 rides a bicycle on a crossroad, ahead of the annual National People's Congress (NPC), in Shanghai, China, 25 February 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Is China ready to live with the virus?

More than half a year after an infectious diseases expert was shot down for proposing living with the virus, Chinese epidemiologist Zeng Guang has cautiously signalled that perhaps it is time for China to transition away from its dynamic zero-Covid policy. Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing reports that Chinese netizens are showing their support for this, voicing their frustration with the prolonged restrictions, while official statistics show a struggling recovery in domestic consumption. Will the benefits of China’s dynamic zero-Covid continue to outweigh its costs?
As Taiwan is set to become a super-aged society in 2025, what is the plight of the elderly destitute in an ageing Taiwan?

Growing old alone: Elderly poor want better housing, better care in Taiwan

Taiwan is set to become a super-aged society in 2025. At present, a considerable proportion of its elderly face poor living conditions, with 430,000 living in old residential buildings without elevator access. There is also a sizeable number of elderly folk who are homeless and living on the streets. What are the authorities doing to meet the living needs of the elderly and provide them with support? How are community groups playing a role?