Healthcare

People walk on a sidewalk in the central business district in Beijing, China on 28 February 2024. (Greg Baker/AFP)

Chinese authorities ramp up meetings with foreign industry giants

Lianhe Zaobao journalist Liu Sha takes a closer look at the Chinese authorities’ frequent meetings with leaders from multinational companies, in particular those from the manufacturing and biopharmaceutical sectors, following the 20th Party Congress. What do these meetings signal, and will they work in terms of stabilising foreign investor confidence?
Office workers walk on a street during lunch hour in the Central district in Hong Kong, China, on 20 November 2023. (Paul Yeung/Bloomberg)

Rise of youth suicides in HK: Academic and unemployment woes

Youth suicide rates are on the increase in Hong Kong, with stresses such as academic pressure and unemployment woes some of the key factors. While the issue is multifaceted, giving hope and promoting mental well-being is a project that everyone in society can work on together.
Healthcare workers in protective gear give residents their Covid-19 tests in Shanghai, China, on 10 July 2022. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

China reinstating the health code to combat respiratory disease?

Following a recent spike in respiratory illness in China, people in some areas have found that the green codes on their long-dormant health code apps have been reactivated, prompting speculation that this particular measure from the pandemic days might be coming back, and also reviving memories of the painful days of lockdown.
Children and their parents wait at an outpatient area at a children's hospital in Beijing, China, on 23 November 2023. (Jade Gao/AFP)

Packed children’s hospitals in Beijing reflects China's social conditions

Academic Zhang Tiankan notes that crowded children’s hospitals in Beijing actually reflect social conditions, such as mindsets towards hospital treatment being the best and also the stressful education system, as children do their homework even while hooked up to IV drips. In many cases, rushing to the hospital as an immediate response could do more harm than good and be a great drain on public resources.
Chinese drugmakers are increasingly partnering with foreign companies to pitch their products overseas, but at what cost? (Srdjan Zivulovic/Reuters)

Cancelled contracts upset Chinese drugmakers’ overseas push

China’s innovative drug developers are increasingly partnering with foreign companies to pitch their products overseas due to tighter profit margins in the domestic market. But this route, while lucrative, can also be precarious.
A security personnel in a protective suit keeps watch as medical workers attend to patients at the fever department of Tongji Hospital, a major facility for Covid patients, in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, on 1 January 2023. (Staff/Reuters)

Chinese doctor: Why non-compliant practices are rampant in China's hospitals

Medical researcher and doctor Hayson Wang assesses that Chinese public hospitals being run like businesses is a key reason for the widespread occurrence of corruption in the medical sector. Unless hospitals are well-funded and supported, they will continue to find it difficult to provide good public welfare and stay away from corruption.
Former Japanese politician Yasuhiro Sonoda publicly drank half a cup of radioactive water that he claimed had been treated in October 2011. (Screen grab from YouTube video)

Chinese academic: Can we die from drinking Fukushima treated wastewater?

With the uproar around the Fukushima treated wastewater at a peak, Chinese academic Zhang Tiankan takes a look at historical and scientific facts that help us understand the risks and effects of drinking treated nuclear-contaminated water. Is the fear justified?
Medical workers rescue a patient at the intensive care unit of Pengshan District People's Hospital, following a surge of Covid-19 infections across the country, in Meishan, Sichuan province, China, on 21 January 2023. (CNS photo via Reuters)

When heroes and the corrupt coexist: Rooting out medical corruption in China

Commentator Tan Haojun highlights the many grey areas that the people in white in China find themselves in, amid an all-out anti-corruption campaign in the medical sector. It may be unimaginable that the same sector lauded for brave work during the pandemic is under investigation for rampant corruption. The reality is that heroes and the corrupt coexist, and only by reining in those hungry for power and profit can the system start to rid itself of the bad hats.
Medical workers wheel a patient at a hospital in Shenyang, China's northeastern Liaoning province, on 21 October 2021. (AFP)

China’s medical crackdown has unintended repercussions

Over the past month, China’s medical sector has been swept by a wave of anti-corruption efforts, with nearly 180 hospital directors and secretaries under investigation so far. Some people cheer the aggressive effort, but it has also created a lot of unintended repercussions. Lianhe Zaobao journalist Chen Jing discusses her own experience seeing doctors in China and warns of the potential drawbacks of a stern crackdown.