Beijing

Medical workers in protective suits administer the Covid-19 vaccine at a makeshift vaccination site in Haidian district, Beijing, China, 8 January 2021. (CNS photo via Reuters)

China's zero-Covid era to end after Chinese New Year?

With the Omicron variant of the coronavirus spreading through China in a fresh wave of infections, is China’s current zero-Covid approach still feasible, given that strict measures did not stamp out the less transmissible Delta variant? To safeguard the economy and global supply chains, will a move towards a post-zero-Covid be inevitable, whether China likes it or not? Zaobao correspondent Edwin Ong reports.
A government banner of the upcoming Legislative Council election is seen through a reflection in Hong Kong on 22 November 2021. (Louise Delmotte/AFP)

First LegCo election under Hong Kong’s new electoral system: Tough road ahead for non-pro-establishment candidates

Following an overhaul of the electoral system in Hong Kong by the Chinese central government, both the pro-democracy and localist camps are not taking part in the upcoming Hong Kong Legislative Council elections, leaving a small number of moderate democrats who advocate dialogue with Beijing in the running. However, a severely fractured society in Hong Kong means that it will not be easy for them to be elected. Faced with the prospect of a LegCo that is likely to be made up of mainly pro-establishment voices, what is the way forward for Hong Kong?
In this file photo taken on 3 November 2021, activists rally in front of the Chinese Consulate in Los Angeles, California, calling for a boycott of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics due to concerns over China's human rights record. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP)

Beijing Olympics diplomatic boycott: Does China care?

Following the announcement of the US’s diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Winter Olympics, Australia, the UK, and Canada have also joined the boycott, while New Zealand has cited the pandemic as its reason for not sending ministerial-level officials to the Games. Zaobao associate editor Han Yong Hong examines the moves by these countries, and notes that perhaps the real reason for the US boycott has more to do with US-China competition and the need to play to the domestic gallery. And while China has reacted strongly to the boycott, is it truly concerned?
(Left to right) Premier Su Tseng-chang, Parliament Speaker You Si-kun and Foreign Minister Joseph Wu have been named by the Taiwan Affairs Office as being “stubbornly pro-Taiwan independence”. (Internet/SPH)

Are Taiwan's DPP politicians fighting to be blacklisted by Beijing?

In Beijing’s latest effort to discourage notions of independence for Taiwan, it has released a list of Taiwan leaders it considers to be “stubbornly pro-Taiwan independence”, seemingly targeted at Green camp members. However, those on the list are wearing it as a badge of honour, as recognition that they love Taiwan, while those not on the list are clamouring to be blacklisted. Will this move backfire on Beijing instead?
A medical worker collects a swab from a person at a nucleic acid testing site at a park, following new cases of the coronavirus disease, in Beijing, China, 6 August 2021. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

China's zero-Covid regime: My home quarantine experience in Beijing

Zaobao’s Beijing correspondent Yang Danxu experienced a 14-day home quarantine for being in the vicinity of Covid-19 patients while in Gansu. From her first-hand experience, she observes that people at large have gotten used to and even expect sudden but orderly disruptions when outbreaks erupt and are stamped out under a zero-Covid regime. But as borders start opening around the world, will China be forced to open up to new mindsets of living with the virus?
Electricity transmission towers are pictured in Beijing, China, 28 September 2021. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

China's power outages: Are local governments' energy conservation efforts going overboard?

Amid a widespread power shortage across China, the authorities have implemented power cuts in several regions. But what is the underlying cause for the power crunch, and will the current measures be effective and sustainable? Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu tells us more.
The Beijing Stock Exchange website was tested on 10 September. (CNS)

New Beijing Stock Exchange will narrow economic gap between northern and southern China

A new Beijing Stock Exchange is good news for technology-focused small- and medium-sized enterprises, especially those with innovation potential but may not fit the listing requirements of traditional exchanges. Not only that, it will likely give a boost to SMEs in the north, helping to balance regional economic imbalances.
Pedestrians cross a traffic intersection near commercial buildings in Beijing, China, 25 August 2021. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

Why China is setting up the Beijing Stock Exchange

With President Xi Jinping’s announcement of a new Beijing Stock Exchange, innovation-oriented SMEs will benefit and Beijing’s stock as a credible financial centre will also rise. Not only that, it is hoped that this will show China’s resolve to continue pursuing the market economy as it continues its push for “common prosperity”.
The Lithuanian Embassy in Beijing on 10 August 2021, as China demanded Lithuania to recall its envoy to Beijing. (Jade Gao/AFP)

Japanese academic: The politics behind the name 'Taiwanese Representative Office in Lithuania'

While Beijing has objected strongly to the Lithuanian government's move of allowing Taiwan to open a representative office under the name “Taiwan” rather than “Taipei”, Taiwan has lashed out at “autocratic” Beijing, saying that its ties with Lithuania are based on the shared values of freedom, democracy, respect for human rights and the rule of law. Japanese academic Shin Kawashima examines the names of Taiwan's overseas offices and of various countries' offices in Taiwan, analysing the subtleties behind the different naming conventions.