China youths

Chinese President Xi Jinping attends a welcoming ceremony for Greek President Prokopis Pavlopoulos outside the Great Hall of the People, in Beijing, China, 14 May 2019. (Jason Lee/Reuters)

Chinese youth will be imbued with tenets of Xi Jinping Thought through school curriculum

The Chinese Ministry of Education has announced that Xi Jinping Thought will be integrated into the school curriculum from primary to university level. What does this mean for students, and what is the aim of the authorities? Zaobao correspondent Wong Siew Fong takes a closer look.
A screenshot of a vlog featuring single living. (Bilibili)

Rejecting their parents' lifestyles, more single Chinese youths are sharing their everyday lives through vlogs

As young Chinese leave their hometowns to work and live in big cities such as Beijing and Shanghai, single living vlogs are gaining popularity. Whether they are toughing it out or living it up, the Chinese youths of today seem to be rejecting their parents' lifestyles and yearning to chart a life of their own. Zaobao correspondent Wong Siew Fong speaks to some Chinese youths about the rise of single living vlogs.
People look at images of late chairman Mao Zedong of the Chinese Communist Party at the Museum of the Communist Party of China that was opened ahead of the 100th founding anniversary of the Party in Beijing, China, 25 June 2021. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

China idol: Mao Zedong makes a comeback among Chinese youth

China’s youth today are turning to Mao Zedong for inspiration amid a crushing sense of social immobility and injustice. But Wang Qingmin recalls the Mao era to be one of violent political struggles, anti-intellectualism, and cult of personality. Is a return to Mao really the answer?
Students enter a school to sit for the first day of the National College Entrance Examination (NCEE), known as “Gaokao” in Beijing on 7 July 2021. (Wang Zhao/AFP)

Destroying independent thinkers: Why China’s tutoring industry needs strong intervention

Technology specialist Yin Ruizhi looks at the vast amounts of money tutoring agencies in China have been spending on advertising to generate quick wins. In the long run, students enrolled at such institutions suffer as they end up memorising material rather than truly learning. Seen in that light, the government’s recent intervention was a long time coming.
This picture taken on 28 July 2021 shows students walking with their guardians after attending private after-school education in Haidan district of Beijing, China. (Noel Celis/AFP)

China's tutoring industry finding new ways to survive after government crackdown

Caixin journalists take a look at China's after-school tutoring industry following a government clampdown that bans all tutoring related to the core school syllabus during vacations and weekends for students in elementary and middle school while barring private tutoring companies from going public or raising foreign capital. What is the industry doing to survive? Will they find new opportunities for themselves amid this major change?
Students leave school after finishing the first day of the National College Entrance Examination (NCEE), known as “Gaokao”, in Beijing on 7 July 2021. (Noel Celis/AFP)

China's tutoring crackdown: It is not a random act by the Chinese government

The Chinese government’s recent crackdown on the tutoring industry is not a random act, says Chinese technology specialist Yin Ruizhi. If one has paid attention to media reports and government work reports, education has been an area of concern since 2013. Hence the "double reduction" policy is necessary and should not be a surprise if you have done your homework.
This picture taken on 29 July 2021 shows students and parents walking after attending a private after-school education in Haidan district of Beijing. (Noel Celis/AFP)

China’s tutoring crackdown: Is the Chinese government prepared for its consequences?

NUS academic Lu Xi notes the recent actions of the Chinese government in regulating the private tutoring industry, and how it has damaged market confidence, leading to an exodus of funds in China concept stocks. He asks if this seemingly ill-considered policy is again the result of extreme rigidity in the Chinese bureaucratic system, allowing no communication between those above and those on the ground. Is the government prepared for its consequences?
A man walks past a logo of Alibaba Group at its office building in Beijing, China, 9 August 2021. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

Alibaba sexual assault case: China’s ugly drinking culture is a show of power

A recent case of sexual assault involving an Alibaba employee has once again turned the spotlight on the business drinking culture in China. Zaobao’s China Desk looks into the prevalent issue that does not seem likely to change anytime soon.
A woman walks past a sign of the Financial Street in Beijing, China, 9 July 2021. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

Why China is cracking down on big capital

It is not new for the evils of capitalism to be criticised in China. But the recent crackdowns on whole sectors, be it tech, tuition centres, or online gaming, has businesses wondering what just hit them. Is this the state’s way of showing who’s boss, and how will China’s economic vibrance be affected?