Truth

US President Donald Trump participates in a phone call with Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley, 4 October 2020, in his conference room at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. (Tia Dufour/The White House/Handout via REUTERS)

Chinese pundits question Trump's diagnosis: Is it the biggest show on earth?

With Trump testing positive for the coronavirus, reactions in China range from schadenfreude among the internet community, to more dignified responses from the Chinese authorities. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan scans sentiments in China and thinks about possible implications for the upcoming US presidential election and the future of US-China relations.
A man under a bridge of the Yangtze river in Wuhan, 15 April 2020. (Aly Song/REUTERS)

When the only option is fraud: How institutional faults led to the spread of the coronavirus in Wuhan

Chen Kang attributes the blindspots in China’s handling of the Covid-19 outbreak to the tendency of officials to withhold information and put up appearances for their own interests. As such, decision-making could be impaired by the asymmetry of information and misaligned interests between superiors and subordinates, especially at the local level. Results then vary based on how well one navigates the minefields of groupthink, collusion and that seemingly innocuous aim of not rocking the boat. Using the prism of formalism, or what is prizing form over substance, Chen points out the weakness of a centralised system.
Staff members wearing face masks are seen at the Leishenshan Hospital, a makeshift hospital for treating patients infected with the Covid-19 coronavirus, in Wuhan, Hubei, China on 11 April 2020. (Aly Song/Reuters)

How to get the world to believe in China's case?

Experts say China is much mistaken if it thinks that serving up nitty-gritty details on the initial stage of the Covid-19 outbreak will help it deal with the groundswell of negative international opinion against the country.
This photo taken on 28 February 2020 shows a statue with a face mask on in Wuhan. (STR/AFP)

Chinese novelist Yan Lianke: When the epidemic ends, let our memories live

In his first creative writing class of the semester, acclaimed Chinese author Yan Lianke addresses the Covid-19 milieu of the times. He urges his students to remember what they have seen and heard as memory separates man from beast; memory begets truth. He says if one cannot speak loudly or even whisper, at least remember.
Volunteers transporting daily necessities and medical supplies to places in need.

[Photo story] Everyday heroes: Selfless acts in the face of adversity

A man queuing and buying medicines for residents, chefs preparing signature dishes, a volunteer turned patient... ThinkChina takes a look at the ordinary lives in China and the heartwarming acts of kindness from everyday heroes.
Li Wenliang sounded the alarm about Covid-19, but paid with his life. (Internet)

Unhappy the land that is in need of heroes

Hong Kong political commentator Leung Man-tao reflects on the dearth of truth in mainland Chinese society as he grieves the passing of Dr Li Wenliang. He remembers the men and women who have gallantly pursued truth in the face of adversity and believes that we can all learn to do the same.