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A coast guard official raises the Indian national flag on board the Indian Coast Guard offshore patrol vessel "Vajra" during its commissioning ceremony, in Chennai, India, on 24 March 2021. (Arun Sankar/AFP)

Indian academic: The Quad gains momentum and China feels threatened

Amrita Jash notes that the Quad has gained momentum since its inaugural virtual leader-level summit in March. China is worried, but she reasons that the Quad is taking a macro view by having a vision for a “free, open rules-based order, rooted in international law” in the Indo-Pacific, and this is a much larger endeavour than just simply targeting China. But whatever the suspicions or discomfort, the Quad mechanism looks set to stay.
This photo taken on 30 March 2021 shows a medical staff member (centre) administering a dose of the Sinovac Covid-19 coronavirus vaccine at a university in Qingdao in China's eastern Shandong province. (STR/AFP)

Why the Chinese are not motivated to get vaccinated

China was among the fastest in vaccine development, but its progress in actual vaccinations has not been satisfactory. In this “second season” coronavirus fight to recover economically and reopen borders, vaccinations will be key. Will China resort to the crude measures it used in the early stages of the pandemic fight to increase its vaccination rates? Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu reports.
In this file photo taken on 25 January 2020, medical staff members wearing protective clothing to help stop the spread of a deadly virus which began in the city arrive with a patient at the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital in Wuhan. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

The world may never know the origins of the Covid-19 pandemic

A Joint WHO-China Study Team report has said that it is "extremely unlikely" that a Wuhan laboratory leak was the origin of the Covid-19 pandemic. Yet the US and other countries have cast doubts on the report, citing delay and access issues. China hit back, labelling this as another smear campaign. With each side singing their own tune, are the report results of any consequence?
A picture of Chinese President Xi Jinping overlook a street ahead of the National People's Congress (NPC), in Shanghai, China, 1 March 2021. (Aly Song/Reuters)

The US gets it wrong again

Rishi Gupta gives a critique of the strategy paper “The Longer Telegram: Toward a New American China Strategy”, by “Anonymous”, which was recently published by the Atlantic Council. He says that judging from the paper and several other important geostrategic content released by the US recently, the US has not read the situation in China and its leadership correctly, and hence has a skewed understanding of how it can draw strength globally to compete with its "most serious competitor".
People take part in a rally to encourage Canada and other countries as they consider labeling China's treatment of its Uighur population and Muslim minorities as genocide, outside the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC, US, 19 February 2021. (Leah Millis/Reuters)

‘Countering sanctions with sanctions’: Where China’s confidence comes from

China is reacting to sanctions imposed by the West with sanctions of its own, with the latest salvo affecting US and Canadian individuals and entities. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan looks at the factors behind China’s increasing penchant for tit-for-tat sanctions.
This photo taken on 21 March 2021 shows people waiting to receive the Covid-19 coronavirus vaccine at a hospital in Huai'an, Jiangsu province, China. (STR/AFP)

Vaccine politics: Can one take a US-made vaccine after taking a China-made one?

Based on science, there is no firm understanding of the effectiveness of the vaccines or how long they last, so getting vaccinated does not mean immunity. Based on politics however, countries seem to be starting to use vaccine nationalism as a tool. Is it not enough to have two worlds split apart by different internets — now will we see a world divided into those who used the Chinese vaccine and those who used other vaccines? Viruses know no borders, but it’s looking like vaccinations will. 
This file picture taken on 5 September 2018 shows flags from the Pacific Islands countries being displayed in Yaren on the last day of the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF). (Mike Leyral/AFP)

Power struggles and Chinese influence in the Pacific Island region

The Pacific Island Forum (PIF) has undergone some intense internal power struggle recently, and the region is also subjected to rising global geopolitical competition and tension. In fact, the "Taiwan-China conflict is virulent in this region", says former German diplomat Dr Anne-Marie Schleich.
A popular meme in China, showing the 1901 meeting involving Li Hongzhang's group, and the recent meeting in Anchorage, Alaska. (Internet)

Alaska meeting: A historic moment of China standing up to the West?

Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan notes the fiery start to the high-level dialogue between China and the US held in Alaska, with both sides trading barbs. However, amid the aggression and the "catharsis" some Chinese netizens felt from China standing up to the West after 120 years, some real communication did take place between the two countries where substantive issues were discussed.
A protester holds up a sign of detained Myanmar civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi as they take part in a demonstration outside the Chinese Embassy against the military coup in Yangon on 13 February 2021. (STR/AFP)

From Yangon to Hong Kong: Why locals attack mainland Chinese companies during political unrest

Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing notes that mainland Chinese companies in Hong Kong, Yangon and elsewhere often find themselves targets of attack. Why are they so unpopular in the very communities they seek to bring greater economic activity to? Perhaps they are expanding too much, too soon and too fast, giving little opportunities for locals to adapt. But their work cultures probably also play a big role.