Western supremacy

People walk along a street in Wuhan, Hubei, China on 29 September 2020. (STR/AFP)

Why modernising China is so difficult

Wei Da calls out China’s modus operandi of seeking modernisation yet fighting it at the same time. He says China’s road to modernisation faces the classic dilemmas of setting its priorities right and establishing new paradigms that will liberate it from the shackles of the past. Only then, can China imagine a future that will bring it on par with advanced civilisations. 
Chinese parents and their children gather at an education fair in Hefei, eastern China's Anhui province, as they search for suitable colleges for further education on June 27, 2009. (AFP)

Study in the US? Chinese students are having second thoughts

The US used to be an attractive place for Chinese students and families, but given its current poor handling of the coronavirus outbreak and emergence of strong anti-Chinese sentiment, many Chinese are reconsidering whether to move there for studies and work. Zaobao journalist Meng Dandan speaks to young Chinese and their families.
Professor Wang Gungwu speaks on China, the coronavirus, and the prospect of a divided world. (SPH)

Wang Gungwu: Even if the West has lost its way, China may not be heir apparent

In a wide-ranging email interview with ThinkChina editor Chow Yian Ping, sinologist Wang Gungwu shares his thoughts on how China and the world have changed because of the pandemic. He keenly observes that Chinese leaders have sought greater control over the population in recent years, and the situation will worsen as the pandemic deepens their insecurities. On the international stage, an intense clash of interests among the major powers looks set to keep nations divided. On the micro-level however, he takes heart that a “globalisation from below” is taking place; the fact that the virus knows no borders has brought people closer together, with opportunities for reset.
US and Chinese flags at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, 14 February 2019. (Mark Schiefelbein via REUTERS)

China to punish Western 'anti-China' forces and 'make them feel the pain', according to Chinese official media report

Following the filing of lawsuits in the US against China for the coronavirus outbreak, China is preparing to hit back with punitive measures. Australia, too, is facing a suspension of beef exports, while China’s Ministry of Commerce has announced tighter controls over exports of medical supplies. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan reports.
This picture taken on 21 February 2020 shows a woman wearing a face mask, amid concerns of the Covid-19 coronavirus, exercising at a park in Beijing. (Wang Zhao/AFP)

Will China turn its back on the world again?

After more than 40 years of reform and opening up to the point that China has become an integral node in global supply chains, will the pandemic be the circuit breaker that cuts off the flow of connections between China and the West? Will the currents of international trade and cooperation flow again or will China ironically be more like the US in thinking “I am the world”? And once allegedly compared by Napoleon to a “sleeping lion”, will China resume its sleep shortly after awakening?
Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament are seen reflected in a cafe window during ongoing renovations to the Tower and the Houses of Parliament, in central London on 17 January 2020. (Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP)

When the narcissists of London and New York meet the coronavirus

Chip Tsao doesn’t mince his words when he points out the hypocrisy of Western metropolis urbanites who feel that nothing can touch them, not least a virus that originated from Asia.
As the world’s second largest economy, China should have gained enough confidence to not be affected by terms like "sick man of Asia". In this photo taken on 25 February 2020, a woman wearing a protective face mask walks on an overpass in Shanghai. (Noel Celis/AFP)

From ‘sick man’ to ‘sleeping lion’: Have the Chinese overreacted?

Yu Shiyu observes that China could be reading too much into terms such as “sick man” and should by now, have the self-confidence to let such comments roll off their backs.