Supply chain

Mochtar Riady, founder of Lippo Group. (SPH)

Lippo Group founder Mochtar Riady: Globalisation without China is unrealistic

Nonagenarian Mochtar Riady, founder of Lippo Group in Indonesia, shared his views on “New Challenges and Opportunities in a Post-Covid-19 World” at a webinar yesterday. He believes that with its combined strength, ASEAN can weather any potential headwinds of deglobalisation. And contrary to what others predict, China’s place in global supply chains is firmly anchored and the country looks set to play a leading role in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.
A woman walks past Vietnam national flags along a street in Hanoi, 18 May 2020. (Nhac Nguyen/AFP)

Foreign investors exiting China: Vietnam milks the gains

Vietnam stands to benefit from MNCs’ efforts to diversify their production base beyond China. How much it will actually benefit, however, depends on how fast it can roll out measures to further improve its infrastructure and business environment.
A sign pasted on a security barricade is seen after the India Gate war memorial was closed for visitors amid measures for coronavirus prevention in New Delhi, India, on 19 March 2020. (Adnan Abidi/File Photo/Reuters)

India-China relations: Compromises and conflicts amid Covid-19

India and China marked 70 years of diplomatic relations with an exchange of letters between the countries’ leaders on 1 April. Other commemorative events were to follow but have been postponed due to the coronavirus. Often mentioned in the same breath as two populous Asian powers on the rise, India and China have seen their fair share of ups and downs as competitors and partners. Apart from derailing the celebratory side of things, how will pressures from the Covid-19 pandemic affect India-China relations?
A woman walks past a portrait of Chinese President Xi Jinping on a street in Shanghai, 12 March 2020. (Aly Song/REUTERS)

Trump threatens terminating phase one trade deal but can China fulfil pre-pandemic promise?

Under the phase one China-US trade deal signed in January, China has committed to purchasing an additional US$200 billion worth of US products and services. But in the current circumstances, will it be able to meet those commitments? And will US President Donald Trump terminate the deal, or negotiate an interim agreement? Will a new trade war escalate matters into a hot war?
People walk past closed stores on the Nakamise shopping street leading to the Sensoji temple in the Asakusa district of Tokyo, Japan, on 25 April 2020. (Soichiro Koriyama/Bloomberg)

Warming up of China-Japan ties hijacked by the pandemic

A severely disrupted supply chain, an inevitable blame game, a collision in the East China Sea... Dr Amrita Jash says that like many things this year, the warming up of China-Japan ties has been hijacked by the spread of Covid-19 and its aftermath.
An employee at a factory in Wuhan, April 6, 2020. (STR/AFP)

US companies in China: No place that can take China's place

Despite a proposed White House executive order to reduce dependence on China for medical supplies, and a promise by US National Economic Council President Larry Kudlow that the US government will pay for US companies to return home, US companies in China are not biting. Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing speaks to some company leaders to find out why.
A farmer harvests cabbage at Huarong county in Hunan province, at the border of Hubei on 5 March 2020. (Noel Celis/AFP)

The impact of Covid-19 on the agriculture sector in China

Vincent Martin, Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) representative in China and North Korea, shares his thoughts on the Chinese government’s efforts to limit the impact of Covid-19 on agriculture and food security in China. He remains sanguine that the country has enough wind in its sails to see it through this tough period and embark firmly on new beginnings.
In this photo taken on 28 March 2020, a shopper walks past a print shop in Berlin with a sign advising its customers to stay at home amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. (Odd Andersen/AFP)

Globalisation as we know it shall come to an end

Zheng Weibin thinks that strategic rivalry between China and the US will only intensify in the wake of the Covid-19 crisis. As the US moves to close off its vulnerabilities in the global supply chain, will Europe do the same and if so, what will the new face of globalisation look like?
Cambodian workers exit their factory as they take a lunch break in Phnom Penh, March 2, 2020. Cambodia's multi-billion-dollar garment industry is at risk of chain disruption from the Covid-19 breakout, as its impacts hammer on Southeast Asia's key industries. (Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP)

Wake-up call for ASEAN countries: Curb over-reliance on China and seize opportunities of global supply chain restructuring

After this battle with the Covid-19 coronavirus, each ASEAN country should step up its emergency preparedness and national resilience capacities in dealing with similar pandemics. But health concerns aside, the outbreak also highlights the region’s high reliance on China in economics and trade. As global supply chains realign in the wake of the crisis, Southeast Asian countries should implement bold domestic reforms and vigorously develop their manufacturing sectors to be in the best position to reap the benefits.