Hong Kong national security law

People wave the flags of Hong Kong and China on the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront promenade in Hong Kong on 1 July 2023. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP)

No place for pan-democrats in today's Hong Kong

Political analyst Wang Qingmin notes that given the near-total power of the Chinese government over Hong Kong, perhaps Beijing can afford to show more tolerance towards the people and government of Hong Kong. This might actually encourage the moderate pan-democrats who love Hong Kong to contribute, which would also benefit mainland China.
People use umbrellas to protect themselves from the rain in Hong Kong, China, on 16 June 2023. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP)

Hong Kong issue only an insignificant part of US diplomacy

Lianhe Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing notes that even as evidence shows that the US does not value Hong Kong as much as pro-democracy Hong Kongers think it does, overly idealistic Hong Kongers still buy into the narrative that the US will step in on Hong Kong’s behalf in dealing with Beijing. It is time for this group to wake up.
A taxi drives under Chinese and Hong Kong flags outside a shopping mall in Hong Kong, China, on 5 July 2023. (Tyrone Siu/Reuters)

Hong Kong’s pursuit of overseas activists could backfire

Lianhe Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing looks at the recent issuance of Interpol “red notices” by the Hong Kong government on eight pro-democracy activists living overseas, and what the move signals.
Paramilitary police officers stand guard south of the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, on 5 March 2023. (Greg Baker/AFP)

China wielding long-arm jurisdiction of its own

Taiwanese commentator Chen Kuohsiang notes that China seems to be using long-arm jurisdiction to curtail overseas critics, activists and publishers. This has far-reaching consequences, not least in officially annexing Taiwan through legal precedent.
A general view of rush hour traffic in Taipei, Taiwan, 17 January 2023. (Ann Wang/Reuters)

Are Hong Kong immigrants welcome in Taiwan?

Zaobao correspondent Woon Wei Jong speaks with academics, professionals and consultants about the difficulties Hong Kongers have in gaining residency in Taiwan, which was previously an easy and straightforward process. Why have some Hong Kongers given up and why are some still set on staying in Taiwan despite the arduous process?
A supporter holds the final edition of the newspaper outside the headquarters of the Apple Daily newspaper and its publisher Next Digital Ltd. in Hong Kong, China, on 24 June 2021. (Paul Yeung/Bloomberg)

When a news media company becomes radically politicised: Jimmy Lai and the Apple Daily saga

The high-profile trial of Apple Daily founder Jimmy Lai has been postponed, with some voices asserting that media freedom has not been respected. From his close observation of Apple Daily in his years as Zaobao’s editor, Lim Jim Koon takes a clear-eyed look at Apple Daily. He says that having crossed the baseline of news media organisations and broken the law, it can no longer justify its actions with media freedom.
People use their mobile phones outside a closed down business in Hong Kong on 1 November 2022. (Peter Parks/AFP)

Hong Kong's left turn could hit its financial centre status

Commentator Lew Mon-hung explores seven contradictions that he observes in the “one country, two systems” policy for Hong Kong, including the stand on the private sector, governance issues, and the dynamic zero-Covid policy. All of these factors have had an impact on Hong Kong, and it remains to be seen how these points will be addressed to ensure the special administrative region’s growth.
Pedestrians cross a road in Hong Kong, China, on 15 October 2022. (Lam Yik/Bloomberg)

Hong Kong struggles to stop brain drain

Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing notes that Hong Kong has seen a mass exodus of talents in recent years, and many have cited exorbitant rent, lack of growth opportunities and other factors as major causes. The brain drain in key sectors will impact the special administrative region’s economic development, given the high dependence on skilled professionals. How should the authorities create opportunities and retain and attract talent?
A publicity poster for Warriors of Future. (Internet)

Hong Kongers are supporting Hong Kong films and making a political statement?

Hong Kong films have been doing well in the second half of this year, with several films among the top in box office takings. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing looks at the factors behind this strong showing, including government funding, cast appeal, pent-up demand due to the pandemic, and possibly an indirect way for people to express their political wants.