Hong Kong national security law

Members of the media (bottom) take photos as (left to right) Acting Law Officer (Special Duties) Llewellyn Mui, Secretary for Justice Teresa Cheng, Hong Kong's Chief Executive Carrie Lam, Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Erick Tsang and Permanent Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Roy Tang arrive for a press conference at the government headquarters in Hong Kong on 13 April 2021. (Anthony Wallace/AFP)

Hong Kong's electoral reform: Powerful businessmen to lose influence in politics?

Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing analyses the Election Committee’s expanded role in deciding who becomes the chief executive and gets to sit on the Legislative Council. Will these adjustments help Beijing reduce the influence of the pro-democracy camp as well as the business sector?
The People's Liberation Army Navy Qinzhou Type 056 corvette docked at the Central Military Dock at Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong, China, 29 March 2021. (Paul Yeung/Bloomberg)

When 'new Hong Kongers' run the show, where do the old ones go?

It is clear that the Beijing government wants to have more say in the governance of Hong Kong, not least with the recent passing of the bill to change Hong Kong’s electoral system allowing more new migrants from mainland China to be part of the Election Committee. Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing charts the rise of these “new migrants” in Hong Kong and the political force they are becoming. How will their increasing assertiveness affect the dynamics between the new and old migrants, as well as the locals?
Ai Weiwei in Montemor-o-Novo, Portugal, 3 March 2021. (Pedro Nunes/Reuters)

Do artworks need to be patriotic? Hong Kong politicians fight over Ai Weiwei's 'middle finger photograph'

In itself, a subversive artwork by Chinese dissident Ai Weiwei to be shown at Hong Kong’s new M+ museum may not have drawn such attention. But under the shadow of the national security law in Hong Kong and the looming chief executive election, everything is magnified a hundredfold.
(left to right) China's top diplomat Yang Jiechi, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken, and US national security adviser Jake Sullivan. (Photos: Pool, AFP, Reuters)

US-China talks in Alaska — how far can they go?

Top officials in the Biden administration and the Chinese government are meeting in Alaska this week for what has been touted as the first high-level contact between the two countries under the new US administration and one to watch. Can this meeting turn the page on testy US-China relations? Yu Zeyuan gives a preview.
Pro-democracy demonstrators gesture with three-fingered salutes outside West Kowloon Magistrates Courts during a hearing for 47 opposition activists charged with violating the city's national security law in Hong Kong on 4 March 2021. (Lam Yik/Bloomberg)

Overhaul of Hong Kong's electoral system: Is it still 'one country, two systems'?

Hong Kong’s electoral reform is set to be a hot topic at this year’s Two Sessions, the annual meetings of the National People's Congress (NPC) and the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) currently underway. Changes are being planned to ensure the principle of “patriots governing Hong Kong”. Will going from a “Hong Kong run by Hong Kongers” to “Hong Kong run by patriots” mean going against “one country, two systems”?
A pro-democracy demonstrator holds a yellow umbrella outside the West Kowloon Magistrates’ Courts during a hearing for 47 opposition activists charged with violating the city’s national security law in Hong Kong, China, 2 March 2021. (Lam Yik/Bloomberg)

Eight months after national security law: What's become of Hong Kong?

The Hong Kong national security law was implemented in June last year, not least to quell the wave of protests that had taken hold of the city. And indeed, it is clear that the new law has worked to restore order. But Zaobao journalist Tai Hing Shing notes that the peaceful situation may not extend below the surface and more needs to be done to tackle deep-seated issues.
US President Joe Biden salutes as first lady Jill Biden puts her hand over her heart during the pass in review after the inauguration ceremony, in Washington, US, 20 January 2021. (Mike Segar/Reuters)

What can we expect from Biden's 'approach of patience' towards US-China relations

Those in China hoping that the Biden administration’s new broom will sweep US-China relations clean may be in for a disappointment. Truth be told, Trump’s words were harsh and actions brash, but his sentiments reflected the times. US academic Wu Guo unravels the true meaning of the Biden administration's “approach of patience” towards China.
Police officers line up during a protest against what the activists see as excessive police force against protesters during previous demonstrations, near China's Liaison Office, Hong Kong, China, 28 July 2019. (Edgar Su/File Photo/Reuters)

Will Norway think twice about awarding the Nobel Peace Prize to Hong Kong activists?

The last time a Nobel Peace Prize was given to a Chinese dissident, China-Norway relations took a great tumble. This year's nominees include Hong Kong’s “Father of Democracy”, Martin Lee. Tai Hing Shing takes a look at his nomination and that of other Hong Kong activists. How likely are they to win and how high exactly are the stakes involved?
Carrie Lam, Hong Kong's chief executive, centre, walks in an area under lockdown in the Jordan area of Hong Kong, China, on 23 January 2021. (Paul Yeung/Bloomberg)

The race is on: Picking Hong Kong’s next chief executive

The Hong Kong chief executive elections are still a year away but speculation is rife as to the possible contenders in the race. Tai Hing Shing surveys the field and does not discount incumbent Carrie Lam.