Taiwan youths

People walk on the street in Taipei, Taiwan, on 25 July 2023. (Ann Wang/Reuters)

Will cross-strait civilian exchange exit from long Covid?

While international tourism and study can be a bridge towards cross-strait understanding and reconciliation, it can sometimes be deployed as a geopolitical gambit. Taiwanese academic Ho Ming-sho shares more.
Taiwan People’s Party Chairman Ko Wen-je on stage at a celebration of the party’s fourth anniversary at the Taichung International Exhibition Center, Taiwan, 6 August 2023. (CNS)

Can Ko Wen-je shake up Taiwan's political scene with his 'one-man party'?

As Taiwan’s presidential election approaches, Democratic Progressive Party candidate William Lai is firmly in the lead. However, Taiwan People’s Party candidate Ko Wen-je is also in a solid second place. Academic Lu Xi opines that if Ko survives the election and TPP becomes a key minority in the Taiwanese Legislative Yuan, Ko's influence will gain greater ground in the coming years as young voters' support continues to grow.
Former Olympic gold medalist Ding Ning in action with a student from National Chengchi University in Taiwan, on 17 July 2023. (CNS)

The cautious restarting of cross-strait academic exchanges

Cultural and academic exchanges between Taiwan and mainland China have restarted since being suspended due to the three-year-long pandemic. While official coordination of these exchanges are proving to be difficult to resume, it remains a priority, in particular for the mainland side. On the Taiwan side, wary of interference ahead of the Taiwan election, relevant authorities are tightening the scrutiny of mainlanders visiting Taiwan. Lianhe Zaobao journalist Miao Zong-Han tells us more.
Taiwanese writer Lung Ying-tai loves living in the mountains, physically and metaphorically. (SPH Media)

Taiwanese author Lung Ying-tai: Everyone needs a mountain in our heart

During an interview about her life in the mountains, Taiwanese author and former minister of culture Lung Ying-tai said that even a metropolis like Singapore which does not have a mountain within its borders is linked to “mountains” in the sense that all of us need a spiritual mountain, a shelter from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. She feels that literature and reading can help us cultivate this mental reserve. Zaobao correspondent Wang Yiming tells us more.
Singapore primary school students in class, 6 April 2023. (SPH Media)

Singapore is becoming the preferred study destination for affluent Asian families

Even amid global developments and tensions, education remains a basic need for young people. Given Singapore’s unique attributes and global outlook, it has become one of the most popular places for students from China and elsewhere.
Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou sits down with Straits Times senior regional correspondent Li Xueying for an exclusive interview at the Presidential Palace in Taipei, Taiwan, in April 2016, a month before he steps down as Taiwan president. (Taiwan Office of the President)

Political significance of former Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou’s China visit

Zaobao associate editor Han Yong Hong notes that while former Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou’s planned visit to several cities in mainland China is deemed an ancestral visit and to lead student exchanges, its political implications cannot be ignored. The trip could be a win for himself and both sides of the Taiwan Strait as the parties involved continue to push for cooperation and peaceful exchanges.
Young people in New Taipei City on 27 January 2023. (Sam Yeh/AFP)

Tackling the growing income gap in Taiwan

Veteran journalist Gu Erde looks at the impact of Taiwan's widening income gap, especially on the youth. Is the government doing enough to strengthen the social security network and protect people's livelihoods?
People gather as they hold candles and white sheets of paper to support protests in China regarding Covid-19 restrictions at National Taiwan University in Taipei, Taiwan, 30 November 2022. (Ann Wang/Reuters)

Why did the Taiwanese support China's A4 revolution?

Taiwanese academic Ho Ming-sho asserts that Taiwan’s show of solidarity with protestors in China’s A4 revolution is better understood under the lens of the history of the island’s pursuit of its own identity. He explains why Taiwan’s civil-society actors chose to react to the protests on universal values, rather than national sentiment.
Taiwan Vice President William Lai Ching-te (front row, centre) gestures along with students participating in the International Youth Ambassador Exchange Programme during their visit to the Presidential Office in Taipei, Taiwan, 16 January 2023. (Facebook/賴清德)

Can DPP's new chair William Lai win the Taiwanese presidential election in 2024?

Zaobao correspondent Woon Wei Jong notes that the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP)'s strong stance of “Taiwan independence” has seen a shift towards a more toned down “peaceful protection of Taiwan”. With Taiwan’s Vice-President William Lai now at the helm of the DPP, he must grapple with internal and external challenges to secure the public’s votes for his party in Taiwan’s 2024 presidential race. In particular, will he be able to persuade the younger voters that his party can achieve the peaceful protection of Taiwan?