Singapore

Professor Wang Gungwu speaks on China, the coronavirus, and the prospect of a divided world. (SPH)

Wang Gungwu: Even if the West has lost its way, China may not be heir apparent

In a wide-ranging email interview with ThinkChina editor Chow Yian Ping, sinologist Wang Gungwu shares his thoughts on how China and the world have changed because of the pandemic. He keenly observes that Chinese leaders have sought greater control over the population in recent years, and the situation will worsen as the pandemic deepens their insecurities. On the international stage, an intense clash of interests among the major powers looks set to keep nations divided. On the micro-level however, he takes heart that a “globalisation from below” is taking place; the fact that the virus knows no borders has brought people closer together, with opportunities for reset.
Mr Lee Kuan Yew speaking at the People's Action Party's annual conference at the Victoria Memorial Hall, 26 June 1955. (SPH)

Will China also move into the 'post-LKY era'?

Among all of Singapore’s leaders, one name is most closely associated with Singapore: Lee Kuan Yew, or simply LKY. Five years after his passing, has Singapore moved on from his style of strong leadership and what will other countries who are keen to follow the country’s same developmental trajectory do in shaping their political systems?
There is a huge potential in the healthcare market in China and the demand for good healthcare will outstrip the supply. However, the planning and strategies around the future of healthcare in China arguably have not put enough consideration into the patients’ experience. (iStock)

Visiting the doctor as a foreigner in China: I see potential for collaboration

It was a very different time when Kwek So Cheer visited the doctor in China prior to the Covid-19 outbreak. Nevertheless, recent events have highlighted the need for countries to band together, sharing knowledge and expertise, not least in healthcare management. Speaking from personal experience, Kwek thinks that Singapore can collaborate with China to build a better healthcare experience beyond this special period.
The headquarter of the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) is pictured in Geneva, Switzerland on 3 March 2020. (Denis Balibouse/Reuters)

China and the US battle for influence at the UN

Singaporean candidate Daren Tang, chief executive of the Intellectual Property Office of Singapore, won the nomination for the post of the new director general of the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) on 4 March, pipping the Chinese deputy director general to the post. Chinese professor Zhu Ying analyses the push back from the US amid China’s rising influence in various UN bodies.
People wearing masks at VivoCity near HarbourFront MRT station in Singapore on 24 Jan 2020. (SPH)

Chinese netizens: Is Singapore 'zen' or has it given up?

Chinese social media has been rife with commentaries asking if Singapore is being too lax and defeatist in its approach to tackling the coronavirus outbreak. Han Yong Hong says beneath the veneer of calm lies characteristics that are peculiar to Singapore society.
Teo Soon Kim (right) with only son Peter Wang, taken in March 1950. The photo was vandalised during the Cultural Revolution.

Singapore’s first female barrister and the cultural revolution: Her happiest moments were spent here

Lost love, tumultuous times. Teo Soon Kim, Singapore’s first female lawyer and daughter of rubber magnate and revolutionary Teo Eng Hock, may have had the most beautiful wedding in Singapore during the 1920s, but she passed away in her staff quarters in China that was just 15sqm in size. In the end, her ashes were laid to rest in Singapore's Choa Chu Kang Christian Columbarium. Chia Yei Yei, senior correspondent of Zaobao, talks to family members and pieces together this poignant story.
Inspired by the region’s thousand years of waterway transportation culture, Raffles City Chongqing’s award-winning design takes the form of powerful sail surging forward on the historic Chaotianmen site where Yangtze and Jialing rivers meet. The photo shows a side profile of Raffles City Chongqing. (CapitaLand)

The road ahead for Chongqing (Part I): What would Raffles say?

In this two-part article, prominent Hong Kong commentator and columnist Yang Jinlin assesses Chongqing’s strengths such as its strategic location and expertise in smart city building and waste management while sharing his personal reflections on how the megacity has changed and will continue to grow as it moves from one decade to the next. Read about Raffles City Chongqing, a 2019 project by CapitaLand Limited, and Chongqing's web in this first part.
Skyline of the Suzhou Industrial Park, one of the many testing grounds for smart city building in China. (Suzhou Industrial Park)

How enterprises survive in China's smart cities

Some survive by possessing core technologies, some survive by promoting an exciting concept, some by self-transformation, others by buying out and inheriting superb small companies. Prof Chen Xi shares the various tactics for enterprises to survive and benefit from smart city market restructuring. Where will the new battleground of smart city projects be and how can Singapore play a role?
The Chinese flag is raised in front of the Chinese Embassy in Dili, capital of Timor-Leste, May 20, 2002. China was the first country in the world to establish diplomatic relations with Timor-Leste. (Xinhua)

Old Chinese, new Chinese and the China factor in Timor-Leste

China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) is extending all over the world, including the little country of Timor-Leste, situated between Indonesia and Australia. How is China’s influence perceived there, and how are the locals reacting? Sim Tze Wei finds out.