Technology

Where is the world headed? George Yeo explores the issues. (iStock)

George Yeo: Human solidarity in a fragmenting world

From a look at the recent street protests and happenings in Hong Kong, Singapore's former Foreign Minister George Yeo explores issues of social media, societal fragmentation, wealth inequality, and big data that have implications for the wider world. Will big data and AI lead to an ever-growing concentration of power? Is the future destined for the dystopia envisioned in George Orwell’s 1984? Or will clever computer minds succeed in creating decentralised internet webs and decentralised AI? While human relationships and institutions adapt to the revolution in technology, we can expect a long transition marked by disruption and confusion. What is needed to overcome the present phase? This is George Yeo's speech at the Induction Comitia 2020 of the Academy of Medicine Singapore on 17 January 2020.
Once the 5G network eliminates the bottleneck of direct connectivity of devices in a unit space however, dreams about the IoT could become a reality. (iStock)

A whole new world with the Internet of Things

While the potential of the Internet of Things (IoT) has been bandied about in the last two decades, it is only now at the dawn of the 5G era that the concept looks set to take off. Sports, education, eldercare...exciting times are ahead for IoT applications that are now within our grasp.
China and the US are tussling for dominance in the Geotech arena. (iStock)

China-US Geotech competition: Does China stand a chance?

In a world ruled by immense technological advancement, a new frontier — Geotech or the nexus between geopolitics and technology — is opening up between key players, China and the US. How their tussle plays out will not only shape the future of the ICT landscape, but the balance of power among nations in the digital age.
The Chinese language media industry faces challenges from several directions. (iStock)

Chinese media companies' quest for survival

How can Chinese newspaper media companies outside of China survive the internet age? Is the perceived decline of quality journalism just a problem for news media companies to solve? Is there an elixir for immortality that can re-energise and sustain the life of good journalism? Head of Singapore Press Holdings’ Chinese Media Group Lee Huay Leng touched on these topics and more in her acceptance speech upon receiving the award for outstanding contributions to the media industry (星云真善美传播奖杰出贡献奖). The event was held in Singapore on 24 November 2019.
Huawei's image is badly damaged after the wrongful detention of its ex-employee, Li Hongyuan. (REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke)

Public anger over Huawei subsiding

Public anger over the wrongful 251-days detention of Huawei ex-employee Li Hongyuan may be subsiding, but Huawei’s damaged reputation may not be easily salvaged in the short term. Lianhe Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan observes that public opinion is a double-edged sword. Companies have to be extremely sensitive when it comes to managing their public relations.
Huawei has found itself the target of public anger following an incident involving the wrongful detention of a former employee. (Hannibal Hanschke/REUTERS)

Huawei under fire over jailed ex-employee

Chinese telecom giant Huawei is facing a tide of public anger from within China, following its handling of an incident involving a former employee who was wrongly jailed for 251 days. Lim Zhan Ting explores how Huawei landed itself in this position and what it can do to recover its image.
Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou leaves her home to appear in British Columbia supreme court for a hearing, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, September 30, 2019. An ankle bracelet is also seen as she leaves for her court hearing. (REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson)

Meng Wanzhou: Your warmth lights my path

On the first anniversary of her arrest in Vancouver, Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou pens an open letter about her days under house arrest. In an emotive account, she says the strength she draws from warm words and gestures will light her way forward. This is the English translation of her full letter in Chinese. The original Chinese version of her letter is included at the end.
People chant slogans and hold the words "release (the protesters)" near a police-cordoned area to show support for a small group of protesters barricaded for over a week inside the Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus in Hung Hom district in Hong Kong on November 25, 2019. (Ye Aung Thu/AFP)

Social protests in the era of affluence

Social movements of today are no longer campaigns by the downtrodden poor but avenues for the well-educated middle class to air their anti-establishment discontent. Aided by social media, these groups appropriate concepts without understanding their true meanings, and look set to stay due to structural imbalance in the world caused by globalisation, technological progress and social divide. Zheng Yongnian opines that states badly need institutional reforms if they are to engage the social movements of today.
Alibaba's Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Daniel Zhang, Hong Kong Financial Secretary Paul Chan, HKEX Chairman Laura Cha and former Hong Kong chief executive Tung Chee-hwa attend Alibaba Group's listing ceremony at the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (HKEX). (Zhang Wei/CNS)

Alibaba’s Hong Kong listing: Why now? Why Hong Kong?

In a record listing of 2019, Alibaba’s stock price in Hong Kong rose by 6.6% during its first day of trading on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. Doing so in the midst of uncertainty in Hong Kong seems risky, but Alibaba’s gambit to reach investors in Asia may just pay off in the long run.