Technology

Huawei's image is badly damaged after the wrongful detention of its ex-employee, Li Hongyuan. (REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke)

Public anger over Huawei subsiding

Public anger over the wrongful 251-days detention of Huawei ex-employee Li Hongyuan may be subsiding, but Huawei’s damaged reputation may not be easily salvaged in the short term. Yu Zeyuan cautions on the delicate relationship between public opinion and enterprise reputation in the internet age.
Huawei has found itself the target of public anger following an incident involving the wrongful detention of a former employee. (Hannibal Hanschke/REUTERS)

Huawei under fire over jailed ex-employee

Chinese telecom giant Huawei is facing a tide of public anger from within China, following its handling of an incident involving a former employee who was wrongly jailed for 251 days. Lim Zhan Ting explores how Huawei landed itself in this position and what it can do to recover its image.
Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou leaves her home to appear in British Columbia supreme court for a hearing, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, September 30, 2019. An ankle bracelet is also seen as she leaves for her court hearing. (REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson)

Meng Wanzhou: Your warmth lights my path

On the first anniversary of her arrest in Vancouver, Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou pens an open letter about her days under house arrest. In an emotive account, she says the strength she draws from warm words and gestures will light her way forward. This is the English translation of her full letter in Chinese. The original Chinese version of her letter is included at the end.
People chant slogans and hold the words "release (the protesters)" near a police-cordoned area to show support for a small group of protesters barricaded for over a week inside the Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus in Hung Hom district in Hong Kong on November 25, 2019. (Ye Aung Thu/AFP)

Social protests in the era of affluence

Social movements of today are no longer campaigns by the downtrodden poor but avenues for the well-educated middle class to air their anti-establishment discontent. Aided by social media, these groups appropriate concepts without understanding their true meanings, and look set to stay due to structural imbalance in the world caused by globalisation, technological progress and social divide. Zheng Yongnian opines that states badly need institutional reforms if they are to engage the social movements of today.
Alibaba's Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Daniel Zhang, Hong Kong Financial Secretary Paul Chan, HKEX Chairman Laura Cha and former Hong Kong chief executive Tung Chee-hwa attend Alibaba Group's listing ceremony at the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (HKEX). (Zhang Wei/CNS)

Alibaba’s Hong Kong listing: Why now? Why Hong Kong?

In a record listing of 2019, Alibaba’s stock price in Hong Kong rose by 6.6% during its first day of trading on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. Doing so in the midst of uncertainty in Hong Kong seems risky, but Alibaba’s gambit to reach investors in Asia may just pay off in the long run.
5G presents a great opportunity for entrepreneurs (Jason Lee/Reuters)

The myths and realities of 5G

With 5G becoming a reality in China as we speak, Yin Ruizhi weighs up the challenges and immense opportunities this technology brings for the telecommunications industry.
Skyline of the Suzhou Industrial Park, one of the many testing grounds for smart city building in China. (Suzhou Industrial Park)

How enterprises survive in China's smart cities

Some survive by possessing core technologies, some survive by promoting an exciting concept, some by self-transformation, others by buying out and inheriting superb small companies. Prof Chen Xi shares the various tactics for enterprises to survive and benefit from smart city market restructuring. Where will the new battleground of smart city projects be and how can Singapore play a role?
Companies in China are going through rapid digital transformation. (iStock)

Digital transformation the Chinese way

Implementing digital transformation initiatives in Chinese tech companies where the retirement age was a mere 40 years old, and extensions were granted as exceptions to good performers, Singaporean Kwek So Cheer learnt more about the Chinese psyche than he did any other practical knowledge.
Minister for Trade and Industry Chan Chun Sing speaking at the Singapore-China Forum held in Shanghai on 6 November 2019. (SPH)

Connecting the world: Role of China and Singapore

Minister for Trade and Industry Chan Chun Sing spoke on the digital economy, China's connectivity, and the role of China and Singapore in this moment in history, at the Singapore-China Forum which was held in Shanghai on 6 November 2019. The forum was organised by Lianhe Zaobao and The Paper, a Shanghai media. The forum is one of the events held during the China International Import Expo (CIIE). ThinkChina presents Mr Chan's speech.