Wei Da

Researcher, commentator

Weida is an expert of intercultural communication strategical study, and an advisor living in the USA.

 

People walk along a street in Wuhan, Hubei, China on 29 September 2020. (STR/AFP)

Why modernising China is so difficult

Wei Da calls out China’s modus operandi of seeking modernisation yet fighting it at the same time. He says China’s road to modernisation faces the classic dilemmas of setting its priorities right and establishing new paradigms that will liberate it from the shackles of the past. Only then, can China imagine a future that will bring it on par with advanced civilisations. 
Soldiers gather in front of Indigenous Defense Fighter (IDF) fighter jets at Makung Air Force Base in Taiwan's offshore island of Penghu, 22 September 2020. (Yimou Lee/REUTERS)

The only way out for the Taiwan issue

While the current situation in the Taiwan Strait seems to be tense, how likely is it to boil over? Both sides are fully aware that if fighting does break out, other countries are likely to get involved, and the implications are enormous. That is why it is critical first and foremost, to work on finding an enduring political solution. Researcher and commentator Wei Da takes a closer look at the issue.
US President Donald Trump arrives for a campaign rally at Pittsburgh International Airport in Moon Township, Pennsylvania on 22 September 2020. (Mandel Ngan/AFP)

There is no grave crisis in the US; China must not read the US wrongly

Wei Da says to avoid making erroneous judgements in taking certain actions, both the US and China need to calmly evaluate and recalibrate their strategic assessments of each other. If cool heads are kept, events such as the upcoming presidential election are not to be feared but welcomed as a harbinger of change.
Soldiers from China's People's Liberation Army carry a state flag at Red Square prior to a military parade, which marks the 75th anniversary of the Soviet victory over Nazi Germany in World War II, in Moscow on 24 June 2020. (Pavel Golovkin/POOL/AFP)

Is China the old Soviet Union?

The US seems to think that China is the old Soviet Union, and worse, that it has been disingenuous and is only showing its true colours now. Given testy relations, China is waiting it out until the US presidential election in November. But even if there is a new president from the Democratic Party in the White House, will China’s woes recede?
People wearing protective masks ride past Lama Temple in Beijing, China, 19 June 2020. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

What is China's biggest challenge?

In the great China-US contest, overcoming weaknesses, more than capitalising on strengths, will be the deciding factor in determining who emerges the victor, says Wei Da. Any country is only as good as its weakest link, and the sooner the both of them realise that and look their shortcomings in the eye, the better. Wei Da identifies China's biggest challenge and its weaknesses in this article.
A massive poster of Deng Xiaoping is seen in Shenzhen, Guangdong, China to commemorate Deng's Southern Tour of 1992, 17 January 2012. (SPH)

What can Deng Xiaoping teach us about diplomacy today?

In Wei Da’s view, diplomacy is not rocket science. Diplomacy is conducted to smooth the creases and pave the way for countries to promote peace and cooperation. The devil is in the details on how countries seek to achieve that. In China’s case, Deng Xiaoping had laid out the broad strokes of an overarching strategy more than 30 years ago. While China finds itself in a much more challenging environment today, many of his approaches are still very relevant.
A pro-democracy activist holds his phone while queueing to pay respects to mark the one year anniversary of a man who fell to his death after hanging a protest banner against the now-withdrawn extradition bill on the scaffolding outside a shopping mall, in Hong Kong on 15 June 2020. (Anthony Wallace/AFP)

National security law for Hong Kong: The US will not back down, so where are we headed?

The proposed national security law for Hong Kong is speedily moving along, with the draft text recently reviewed at the 19th session of the Standing Committee of the 13th National People’s Congress. Nonetheless, US researcher Wei Da says that this issue is a trigger point that impinges on bottom lines that could set off serious conflict and repercussions in the Taiwan Strait. Is the onset of a hot war unfolding before our eyes?
People walk past a mural on 26 May 2020 in New York City. (Angela Weiss/AFP)

How to become a country with deity-like qualities? Learn from the US

Before walking under a cloud of strained relations, China had been an admirer of US innovation, creativity and enterprise. Recent troubles have shown that the US is no deity, but US-based researcher Wei Da reminds us that some of its deity-like qualities are worth emulating. What must China do to elevate itself and put on some deity-like armour of its own?
In this file photo taken on 19 January 2020, Chinese and US national flags flutter at the entrance of a company office building in Beijing. (Wang Zhao/AFP)

Lack of equity in China-US relationship reason for confrontation

US researcher Wei Da reasons that the US had accepted a less-than-equitable relationship with China, in terms of fairness, openness, transparency, rule of law, freedom, regulations, the market economy, and civil society, thinking that China would gradually level up. With these hopes dashed, the only option left would be confrontation. He examines how such a scenario would play out in what the media describes as “a new Cold War”.