Wei Da

Researcher, commentator

Weida is an expert of intercultural communication strategical study, and an advisor living in the USA.

 

A pro-democracy activist holds his phone while queueing to pay respects to mark the one year anniversary of a man who fell to his death after hanging a protest banner against the now-withdrawn extradition bill on the scaffolding outside a shopping mall, in Hong Kong on 15 June 2020. (Anthony Wallace/AFP)

National security law for Hong Kong: The US will not back down, so where are we headed?

The proposed national security law for Hong Kong is speedily moving along, with the draft text recently reviewed at the 19th session of the Standing Committee of the 13th National People’s Congress. Nonetheless, US researcher Wei Da says that this issue is a trigger point that impinges on bottom lines that could set off serious conflict and repercussions in the Taiwan Strait. Is the onset of a hot war unfolding before our eyes?
People walk past a mural on 26 May 2020 in New York City. (Angela Weiss/AFP)

How to become a country with deity-like qualities? Learn from the US

Before walking under a cloud of strained relations, China had been an admirer of US innovation, creativity and enterprise. Recent troubles have shown that the US is no deity, but US-based researcher Wei Da reminds us that some of its deity-like qualities are worth emulating. What must China do to elevate itself and put on some deity-like armour of its own?
In this file photo taken on 19 January 2020, Chinese and US national flags flutter at the entrance of a company office building in Beijing. (Wang Zhao/AFP)

Lack of equity in China-US relationship reason for confrontation

US researcher Wei Da reasons that the US had accepted a less-than-equitable relationship with China, in terms of fairness, openness, transparency, rule of law, freedom, regulations, the market economy, and civil society, thinking that China would gradually level up. With these hopes dashed, the only option left would be confrontation. He examines how such a scenario would play out in what the media describes as “a new Cold War”.
A man wearing a face mask crosses a road in Wuhan. China has not handled the Covid-19 epidemic well, and its shortcomings are showing. (Reuters)

Covid-19 epidemic exposes China’s shortcomings

Researcher and commentator Wei Da says the recent coronavirus situation serves to remind China that self-reflection and finding the right balance between four key variables — democracy, scientific thinking, rule of law and religion — are greatly needed.
In America, the spat was just an economic and trade issue; it is a very different picture for China. (Nicolas Asfouri/AFP)

Why would China agree to such a “one-sided” deal?

US-based expert Wei Da says the recently concluded phase one trade agreement shows that China may have ended up being called to heel by the US. Faced with a list of demands that it needs to fulfil, China should be reminded that its giant market is not everything. It will need to make fundamental improvements before it dares to believe that it is soon catching up to the US.