Yang Danxu

Shanghai Correspondent, Lianhe Zaobao

Yang Danxu is currently Lianhe Zaobao's Correspondent in Shanghai. Based in China's most vibrant region, she covers politics, diplomacy, political economy and social trends in the country, focusing especially on the Yangtze River Delta region.

The outbreak of the Wuhan coronavirus is rapidly escalating. In this photo taken on 21 January 2020, people wearing protective masks are seen arriving at Beijing railway station to head home for the Lunar New Year. (Nicolas Asfouri/AFP)

Wuhan coronavirus: Lack of urgency and transparency to blame?

Wuhan is now a quarantine zone with a death toll in China of 17 and more than 570 infected. Cases have also been surfacing elsewhere such as Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea and the US. In light of such rapid escalation, Yang Danxu questions why it has taken this long for the Chinese authorities to step up their crisis efforts.
Women wearing masks in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong authorities have stepped up vigilance against the mystery pneumonia in Wuhan. (CNS)

China’s mystery pneumonia

The recent outbreak of a mystery pneumonia in Wuhan brings back memories of the 2003 SARS epidemic. How are the Chinese authorities responding differently this time, and are people sufficiently reassured?
Queues that last for hours on end are characteristic of first stores. Pictured here is a long queue outside Taotaoju Restaurant.

"First stores" and "China cool": A new era in Chinese consumerism

Shanghai correspondent Yang Danxu observes that domestic consumption in China is getting a second wind from “first store” openings and a “China cool” wave led by time-honoured brands that have found the sweet spot between the old and new.
A large 拆 ("demolish") is painted on the wall of a building in China due to be torn down. (Internet)

Relocation, Relocation, Relocation: Who wants to be a Chinese millionaire

Lianhe Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu talked to a Shanghai Didi driver whose family made nearly 20 million RMB (close to S$4 million) from the government's relocating exercises. His old properties measured just 35 square metres in total. What a way to get rich! But what are the problems that lie beneath the surface?
Visitors getting a look at the Bibles churned out by Amity Printing Co. in Jiangsu. (United Bible Societies)

World’s largest Bible printer hails from atheist China

China's Amity Printing Co. (APC) produces an average of 70 Bibles per minute. This month, Jiangsu-based APC celebrates the printing of its 200 millionth Bible. Yang Danxu observes that its monopoly over the Bible economy helps to ensure that Christianity in China adapts to the context in China, as desired by the Chinese government.
The Golden Rooster Awards and Golden Horse Awards went head-to-head this year, including the poster designs.

Did the Rooster or the Horse win?

The two most important award ceremonies of the Chinese film industry- the Golden Rooster Awards and the Golden Horse Awards- were held on the same day this past weekend, in Xiamen and Taipei respectively. Yang Danxu gives her take on each show and how little signs and symbols in each mirror the one-upmanship in cross-strait relations.
Tiffany & Co. held its grand exhibition at the Fosun Foundation Shanghai, themed "Vision & Virtuosity". (Photo: Yang Danxu)

The myth of China’s solid consumer demand

Why relying on domestic consumption to sustain China’s economy is putting one’s eggs all in one (wrong) basket.
China’s domestic economic growth is slowing while companies’ operating costs are going up. Foreign trade orders have been impacted by a worsening global trade environment, and China’s private companies are facing new challenges in transformation and upgrading. (AFP)

Private enterprises in China feel the heat of government influence

In September this year, the Hangzhou municipal government started sending government officers to be attached to some private companies, sparking discussion and speculation over the motive behind such a move. What are these private companies concerned about, and are these concerns valid?
The mother of Li Xincao went online for help to seek justice for her daughter's mysterious death. (Internet)

Who killed the girl? Chinese keyboard warriors seek justice online

The death of a teenager and the reduced sentence of a triad boss may seem unrelated, but these two cases in Kunming have united China's Internet community in a common search for truth and justice. Shanghai correspondent Yang Danxu looks at the lack of trust between the Chinese public and its law enforcement system.