Yang Danxu

Beijing Correspondent, Lianhe Zaobao

Before Yang Danxu became Lianhe Zaobao's Beijing correspondent, she was the newspaper's Shanghai correspondent. When she was based in Shanghai, she covered politics, diplomacy, political economy and social trends in the country, focusing especially on the Yangtze River Delta region.

Car assembly at Beijing Benz.

How labour-intensive factories and packed dormitories achieve 'zero infections' in China

With the coronavirus affecting businesses and production industries worldwide, Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu finds out how companies and factories in China are ensuring that workers stay healthy and virus-free.
A woman holds a small bottle labeled with a "Vaccine COVID-19" sticker and a medical syringe in this illustration taken 10 April 2020. (Dado Ruvic/REUTERS)

Chinese, American and European vaccines — will we have the luxury of choice?

As the world races to find a vaccine for the coronavirus, politics has made it a strategic contest. But while everybody wants to be the first to develop a vaccine that works and put it out on the market, experts say that vaccines cannot be forced, and it is possible that one may not be found at all. Even if found, the vaccine has to be made available to everyone to ensure that the pandemic ends across the globe. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu speaks to scientists and experts to find out more.​
Young people wearing face masks amid concerns over the Covid-19 coronavirus walk dressed in Tang Dynasty costumes at Century Park in Shanghai on 22 March 2020. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

Is China’s younger generation having it better?

When a video depicting the rosy lives of youth in China went viral on China’s Youth Day (4 May), young and old Chinese alike stopped to ponder what kind of society the youth have inherited. Is it paved with gold, or just as rough around the edges as before? Amid new problems that a rising China faces today, the post-90s generation will just have to make this era their own, with all its foibles, just as their parents and earlier generations have done before them.
China can easily face a passive disadvantage in handling its external relations if callow nationalists gain control of the Internet. In this photo taken on 14 April 2020, people wearing face masks are seen at a main shopping area after the lockdown was lifted in Wuhan, China. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Chinese nationalist internet warriors creating diplomatic disputes for China

China is finding out that overzealous nationalist internet warriors can do its foreign relations more harm than good. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu learns that China's neighbouring countries are taking these internet voices seriously because of China's unique political system.     
A case of sexual abuse has recently swept the Chinese internet community. (iStock)

Chinese netizens stand firm behind sexually abused 'adopted daughter'

The case of a former high-calibre law consultant who allegedly sexually abused a teenage girl has been making the rounds among China’s internet community. While the man argued that theirs was a consensual relationship, netizens are not buying it. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu asks: "What does it mean when justice has to be upheld by public opinion?"
People wearing face masks sit outside Hankou Railway Station in Wuhan in hopes of taking one of the first trains leaving the city early on 8 April 2020. (Noel Celis/AFP)

Would Fang Fang’s English-translated Wuhan diary become ammunition for anti-Chinese forces?

Yang Danxu notes that netizens are making mountains out of molehills and imposing their judgements on others. She points out the danger of politicising issues to the point that no one feels free to even make innocuous comments about the weather.
A woman wears a face mask as a preventive measure against the Covid-19 coronavirus as she looks at her mobile phone near the entrance of the Peking University People's Hospital in Beijing on 21 February 2020. (Greg Baker/AFP)

Visiting the doctor as a foreigner in China: I wish they will not become complacent

Lianhe Zaobao’s Beijing correspondent Yang Danxu recounts her recent visit seeking medical treatment in Beijing in times of Covid-19. She extrapolates from her experience of being initially turned away and sounds a reminder to officials not to let complacency or a wish to maintain a positive recovery record lead to China facing a recurrent rash of outbreaks.
Journalists at the daily press briefing of the Chinese Foreign Ministry in Beijing, March 18, 2020. (Thomas Peter/REUTERS)

US journalists expelled: Diplomatic clash or press freedom in downward spiral?

Following the US labelling China state-owned media organisations in the US as “foreign operatives” and limiting US-based Chinese media staff, China has retaliated by expelling US journalists from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. Yang Danxu and Norman Yik examine how this might affect China-US relations, the “one country, two systems” policy, and press freedom in China.
A Battle Against Epidemic: China Combating Covid-19 in 2020, China Intercontinental Press, People's Publishing House. (Internet)

Government-endorsed ‘epidemic textbook’ taken off the shelves: A celebration too soon?

Amid rising negative feedback, the plug was pulled from launching a government-endorsed publication on China’s experience battling Covid-19. Rightly so, says Beijing correspondent Yang Danxu, as now is not the time to celebrate success when the battle to overcome the epidemic has not been won.