Yin Ruizhi

Technology Specialist

Yin Ruizhi is co-founder of Qinglan Smart Technology Research Pte Ltd, Chief Technology Officer of IPP Review, and Deputy General Manager of Haoyuan5G.

Actors stand near a board with logos of Maoyan Entertainment and Chinese company ByteDance's app TikTok, known locally as Douyin, at a red carpet ceremony at the Beijing International Film Festival, in Beijing, China, 20 September 2021. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

China's burgeoning e-commerce cyberspace and its ever more complex regulations

Technology specialist Yin Ruizhi says that many users of platforms like Douyin, Kuaishou and WeChat spend hours each day scrolling aimlessly for interesting content, and the art of directing these potential consumers to their products through content creators is complicated. To facilitate this process, it is necessary to ensure fair competition for all participants. This is where anti-monopoly rules can play a part, and with a growing cyberspace, it will be an ever more complex task.
People visit the Alibaba booth during the 2021 China International Fair for Trade in Services (CIFTIS) in Beijing, China, 4 September 2021. (Florence Lo/Reuters)

How internet giants' monopolistic practices hurt SMEs in China

Internet giants in China have been engaging in monopolistic practices that hurt the development of small- and medium-sized enterprises, says technology specialist Yin Ruizhi. As such, these practices will be dealt with by the government if the platforms themselves do not find ways to resolve them. Is this another move towards "common prosperity"?
The Alibaba Group signage is seen during the company's 11.11 Singles' Day global shopping festival at their headquarters in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China, 11 November 2020. (Aly Song/Reuters)

After reining in the tutoring sector, will the Chinese government target internet titans next?

With the Chinese government’s recent big crackdown on the education sector, some people are concerned that other internet platforms such as Alibaba and Meituan might be next. Technology specialist Yin Ruizhi explains why it is unlikely that Chinese internet titans will be hit as hard.
Students enter a school to sit for the first day of the National College Entrance Examination (NCEE), known as “Gaokao” in Beijing on 7 July 2021. (Wang Zhao/AFP)

Destroying independent thinkers: Why China’s tutoring industry needs strong intervention

Technology specialist Yin Ruizhi looks at the vast amounts of money tutoring agencies in China have been spending on advertising to generate quick wins. In the long run, students enrolled at such institutions suffer as they end up memorising material rather than truly learning. Seen in that light, the government’s recent intervention was a long time coming.
Students leave school after finishing the first day of the National College Entrance Examination (NCEE), known as “Gaokao”, in Beijing on 7 July 2021. (Noel Celis/AFP)

China's tutoring crackdown: It is not a random act by the Chinese government

The Chinese government’s recent crackdown on the tutoring industry is not a random act, says Chinese technology specialist Yin Ruizhi. If one has paid attention to media reports and government work reports, education has been an area of concern since 2013. Hence the "double reduction" policy is necessary and should not be a surprise if you have done your homework.
The app of Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi is seen on a mobile phone in front of the company logo displayed in this illustration picture taken on 1 July 2021. (Florence Lo/Illustration/File Photo/Reuters)

Why platform companies seek monopoly and what happens when governments rein them in

Leaked data from one platform company may not pose a major national security threat, but data from multiple platforms combined might, warns technology specialist Yin Ruizhi. As countries become more wary of internet security risks, it will be increasingly difficult for platform companies to get listed overseas. What is the alternative then?
An employee plays a video game at the Espot gaming centre in Paris, on 31 May 2021. (Stephane de Sakutin/AFP)

When the virtual world is fairer: Why more youths are addicted to gaming

Technology specialist Yin Ruizhi examines the psychology of getting into “the zone” when playing games and the comfort of being immersed in a more egalitarian world.
A Tencent Games sign is seen at the China Digital Entertainment Expo and Conference (ChinaJoy) in Shanghai, following the Covid-19 outbreak, China, 31 July 2020. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Mobile gaming: The cash cow of China’s mobile phone industry

Few realise that the mobile gaming industry and the mobile phone industry have a symbiotic relationship. Technology specialist Yin Ruizhi explains how cuts of the revenue that mobile companies get from game app developers help them to thrive despite offering "value for money" phones.
Some items featured on Mi Crowdfunding. (Screen grabs from Mi Crowdfunding)

China's live-streaming e-commerce: The million dollar business fueling product innovation

Recently, Xinba, one of the biggest influencers on Chinese streaming platform Kuaishou, sold US$300 million worth of goods in a single 12-hour session, in a testament to the enormous pull of live-streaming e-commerce. Research shows that crowdfunded products often rely on live-streaming e-commerce to convey product information and funnel early adopters. Such an ecosystem creates a positive business environment for producing and marketing new products. Technology specialist Yin Ruizhi looks at how live-streaming e-commerce is fast giving China the edge in product innovation.