Caixin Global

Caixin Global

Built on Caixin Media’s award-winning journalism, Caixin Global delivers fast, reliable business and financial news about China to the world. It offers its English news via a 24/7 digital and mobile platform (caixinglobal.com), and runs a print magazine. Its editorial staff are insiders with a profound understanding of China's economic and social changes. As an industry leader in China, Caixin Global is a media pioneer in exploring overseas markets and is well-positioned to serve global users with insights, information and news reports about China. 

 

A conveyer belt dumps iron ore into a pile at an iron ore transfer and storage centre operated by the Shanghai International Port Group in Shanghai, China, on 26 January 2010. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

China’s plan to break foreign iron ore dependence — mine more at home

China's "Foundation Plan" for iron ore has gained much official support, and is aimed at reducing reliance on foreign sources of iron, including Africa and Australia. The only way to do this effectively is for China to ramp up mining of its own iron resources. However, these resources are scattered and difficult to access, and of lower grade. This means China has its work cut out if it is to succeed.
People ride bicycles along a street at a Central Business District in Beijing on 8 July 2022. (Wang Zhao/AFP)

From Singapore to China, data centre investments thriving amid challenges

Data centres have become a thriving sector in the Asia Pacific, with global companies setting up infrastructure in hotspots such as Singapore, Hong Kong and Sydney. Compared with traditional real estate assets, data centres promise higher returns on investment. However, developers will need to contend with rising energy costs and stricter regulations for greener developments.
Workers watch as a crane lifts a structure at a construction site in Shanghai, China, 14 January 2022. (Reuters/Aly Song)

China's all-out effort to fund infrastructure and save the economy

Amid the economic slump due to the unpredictable Covid-19 situation, China is increasing its investments in infrastructure in efforts to jumpstart domestic demand and boost economic recovery. While profitable projects are hard to find, the renewables, technology and water management sectors are set to benefit from the government's push. However, the risk of inflation and rising cost of raw materials could limit the boost to economic growth.
Pedestrians walk past a SoftBank mobile shop in Tokyo, Japan, on 12 May 2022. (Charly Triballeau/AFP)

How Japanese conglomerate SoftBank wrested back control of Arm China

Masayoshi Son, billionaire head of SoftBank Group Corp. may finally be able to push ahead with launching a US IPO for semiconductor and software design giant Arm Ltd., after wresting control of Arm China back from ousted CEO Allen Wu. It was no mean feat and a saga of twists and turns. But even now, some questions of Arm China’s shareholding and business remain unanswered.
A man walks near a coal-fired power plant in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China, 27 November 2019. (Jason Lee/File Photo/Reuters)

Ukraine war driving up coal prices in China

Following a nationwide power shortage, China moved to rein in coal prices starting in October 2021. But experts reveal that prices have become a huge problem again this year, as imports grow pricier due to the war in Ukraine and regulations such as the price cap prove inefficient.
College students looking for suitable jobs at the job fair in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, 29 May 2022. (Yan Bo/CNS)

Depression among China's college students reveals anxieties about jobs and Covid

Even with the easing of lockdown measures across China, the prolonged uncertainty has left a deep impact on youths. The grim employment outlook, volatile pandemic situation, along with the lack of mental health support, have led to elevated feelings of anxiety and insecurity among the young generation.
A woman holds Chinese RMB banknotes in this illustration taken on 30 May 2022. (Dado Ruvic/Illustration/Reuters)

Easing pandemic controls could curb RMB’s tumble against the dollar

The RMB's recent dramatic weakening did not come as a surprise to many. As stringent Covid-19 measures gradually ease, along with possible relaxations of policies in the real estate sector, could the worst be over for China's economy?
An aerial shot of the collapsed "self-built" building in Changsha, Hunan province, China, on 29 April 2022. (CNS)

Building collapses in China call for more stringent checks on structural safety

An eight-storey building adjacent to the Changsha Medical University collapsed on 29 April, killing 54 people, mainly students. It turned out that the building was a "self-build" that had been modified by the owners rather than constructed by developers. Authorities are now clamping down on safety inspections of building structures, but is it a case of too little, too late?
This file photo taken on 4 August 2021 shows police officers wearing protective gear against the spread of Covid-19 spraying disinfectant at Nanjing port, Jiangsu province, China. (AFP)

China’s powerful export engine losing steam amid Covid-19?

Waves of Covid-19 outbreaks have dealt a big blow to China's economy, with strict anti-epidemic measures affecting businesses, exports and trade. Lockdown uncertainties have also sparked fears of increased competition with foreign manufacturers and a global supply chain restructuring away from China. Caixin surveys the challenges ahead.