China Desk, Lianhe Zaobao

China Desk, Lianhe Zaobao

Lianhe Zaobao is a Chinese-language broadsheet published by Singapore Press Holdings. It was established in 1983, following the merger of Nanyang Siang Pau and Sin Chew Jit Poh, which were started in 1923 and 1929 respectively. It offers timely, credible news reports and a wealth of features, commentaries and opinion pieces. With a Singapore perspective, it also provides news and valuable insights on developments in East Asia, particularly China. In 1995, Lianhe Zaobao became the first Chinese-language newspaper in the world to go online with its portal zaobao.sg. The website has now grown into two sites — zaobao.com to cater to its readers in the greater China region, and zaobao.sg for readers in Singapore and elsewhere.

The paper has correspondents in Beijing, Chongqing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Taipei, Seoul and Tokyo, and experienced stringers in the Philippines, Japan, Europe and the US. It is one of the few foreign-owned Chinese-language media that is accessible online in China. Zaobao.com has an average of 5 million unique visitors per month, and a monthly pageview count of 100 million in China. The print edition of Lianhe Zaobao is also circulated in Indonesia, Brunei, Hong Kong, Vietnam and major cities of China like Beijing and Shanghai.

Hong Kong Chief Executive John Lee (second from right) with three former participants of the Hong Kong Space Museum's Young Astronaut Training Camp. (Weibo/李家超)

Hong Kong has a place in China's aerospace future

China recently announced that its space exploration programme will recruit payload specialists from Hong Kong and Macau, sparking excitement for the people of Hong Kong. While the announcement is a recognition of the special administrative region’s R&D capabilities, some believe that it is an effort to win over the people of Hong Kong and boost their sense of belonging and patriotism. Lianhe Zaobao’s China Desk takes a look at what this opportunity means for Hong Kong.
Renowned virologist Guan Yi. (Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine official website)

A Chinese virologist's changing fortunes for speaking up against zero-Covid

China's renowned virologist Guan Yi has reappeared in public as the newly appointed chief of the Shanghai Virus Research Institute, after being denounced for his alarmist views of the pandemic at the start of its outbreak and speaking against the zero-Covid measures. But now, will his return mark an end to the harsh restrictions that have left the Chinese economy in a dire state?
In this file photo taken on 13 October 1986, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II reviews an honour guard after being greeted by Chinese President Li Xiannian in Beijing, China. (Walter Landholt/AFP)

Queen Elizabeth II: The British monarch who reigned longer than Emperor Kangxi

Queen Elizabeth II was not only an ever-present figure in British modern history, she also played an important role in diplomacy. Over her 70-year reign, she has met with Chinese leaders since the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949 and witnessed the handover of Hong Kong. Lianhe Zaobao’s China Desk takes a look at the late Queen’s relationship with China.
A man rides a scooter with two children on board during a Covid-19 lockdown in the Jing'an district of Shanghai, China, on 25 May 2022. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

Chinese netizens lament barbarity of one-child policy era

A recent case of a couple looking for their son who was taken from them as a baby and “reallocated” in the 1990s has been circulating online, prompting the question of how many other similar cases of “reallocation” have happened over the years in China. What is the fate of these children, and can they be found?
An elderly man exercises inside a residential area under lockdown due to Covid-19 coronavirus restrictions in Beijing on 22 May 2022. (Noel Celis/AFP)

Old and digitally unsavvy: China’s elderly bearing brunt of the digital divide

​As China embraces the digital age where smartphones are an integral part of life, one group seems to be left behind — the elderly, who generally need help to use apps for everyday activities. While the government does have some mitigating measures in place, are they enough?
Tesla Inc CEO Elon Musk speaks onstage during a delivery event for Tesla China-made Model 3 cars at its factory in Shanghai, China, 7 January 2020. (Aly Song/File Photo/Reuters)

The Chinese government is wary of Tesla

An alleged ban of Tesla cars from Beidaihe, the site of Communist Party leaders’ annual retreat, shows the fangs behind the smiles in the Chinese government’s attitude towards US company Tesla. Lianhe Zaobao’s China Desk has the analysis.
Graduates attend their graduation ceremony in the Macau University of Science and Technology in Macau, China, on 5 June 2022. (CNS)

Post-00s youths want to rewrite workplace norms in China

In pursuit of better working conditions, China's post-00s generation has gained a reputation for being newbies who are difficult to manage and who show their superiors little respect. While those who go to extremes may be in the minority and some admire their brave fight for workplace rights, ultimately, they may be putting their job prospects in jeopardy.
Eileen Gu at the Beijing Winter Olympics, 10 February 2022. (Mike Blake/Reuters)

Chinese netizens questioning Eileen Gu's identity and loyalty

Skiing star Eileen Gu has announced that she will be an ambassador for Salt Lake City’s bid for the 2030 or 2034 Winter Olympics, sparking online debate in China. In today's increasingly polarised world, can a "globalised" person gain acceptance and recognition from conflicting parties and be that communicator of goodwill?
In this file photo taken on 22 March 2022, Tesla CEO Elon Musk is pictured as he attends the start of the production at Tesla's "Gigafactory" in Gruenheide, southeast of Berlin. (Patrick Pleul/AFP)

Elon Musk: The American boss with a 'Chinese heart'

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has sent a warning to his staff: come back to the office or leave Tesla. Even as more companies are accepting remote and flexible working arrangements, is Musk merely putting into words what many bosses have not said? Zaobao’s China Desk looks at whether the days of working from the office are really numbered.